Your Essential Guide to Art Fair Philippines 2019

A guide for whether you have a whole day, three hours, or 90 minutes.

by the SPOT.ph team
Feb 21, 2019

(SPOT.ph) With four whole floors of art, making the most out of your Art Fair Philippines experience can be overwhelming. There's the question of which floor to spend the most time on, which gallery you can just breeze through, and which work of art you'd need more than a few minutes to linger on. Not all of us have all the time in the world, so we've rounded up the must-see pieces depending on how much time you can spare for this weekend's Art Fair Philippines. Got a full day, just three hours, or a quick 90 minutes? Just scroll down to find the guide that's right for you. We've also included the exact locations just in case you get lost wandering around.

Don't forget, it's happening for three days only—from February 22 to 24, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. at The Link in Makati City. You can buy tickets (P350) online through the Art Fair Philippines' website or on-site at the fourth-floor reception area. Concession tickets for students, PWDs, and senior citizens are also available—just show your valid IDs.

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#ArtFairPH in One Day

Congratulations, you've managed to set aside a whole day of your weekend to enjoy a once-a-year art festival. Now, while you have all the time in the world to see all the easy-to-spot art installations by Art Fair Philippines' featured artists for the year, don't overlook the easy-to-miss corners of the partner galleries. We've also rounded up where you can hang out and eat in between marveling at all the art on display.

The Link - Landmark Bridge

“Plastics in Our Ocean” by Olivia d'Aboville and Neal Oshima
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d'Aboville and Oshima didn't hesitate to show us the reality that plastic waste now fills our oceans and, in this case, fishermen's nets. On the floor, you'll see phrases that are aimed at making us realize the effects of what we do on a daily basis: "We won't live forever, but our rubbish does." To make sure you won't miss this installation, we recommend passing by the newly opened bridgeway from the third floor of The Landmark to the fouth floor of The Linksaves you from walking under the sun, too.

Fourth Floor

AC Automotive

"Car Keys" by Ian Carlo Jaucian
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This interactive exhibit by Ian Carlo Jaucian will remind you of an old-school gramophone. The experiment repurposes car wheels and treats them like vinyl records to create a form of data art. The depth of the rim’s surface is detected by the infrared proximity sensor, which is then processed digitally using a computer to create a melody. It’s a can't-miss experience for those into music, math, art, or cars.

teamLab

"Reversible Rotation - Continuous, Black in White" by teamLab
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For fans of digital art, "Reversible Rotation - Continuous, Black in White" by teamLab is worth checking out. It is a continuous, digital piece that features spatial calligraphy, and derives inspiration from the Japanese sho, a traditional musical instrument in a three-dimensional space. This work of art highlights brush strokes and their depth, speed, and power. It’s also subject to interpretation—does it rotate clockwise or counterclockwise? All the more reason to see it for yourself.

Fifth Floor 

ArtFairPH/Projects

"Behold A City" by Ryan Villamael
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Ryan Villamael's "paper town" is a delicate depiction of Manila and its fragile beauty, with historic structures going neglected and falling into ruin. While it would be easy to take a quick glance and sum it up in a sentence or two, take a moment to appreciate the details and the painstaking work that clearly went into them. How many of the city's landmarks can you identify?

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"Nung Gambalain Yung Sayawan" by Liv Vinluan

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Balancing whimsy with melancholy is no easy feat, but Liv Vinluan manages it in "Nung Gambalain Yung Sayawan"which, one should remember, is actually about history and how it constantly repeats itself. The images on the large vellum-paper canvas evoke a certain wistfulness, and that in itself is apt when you consider past mistakes you'd want to go back and correct.

Vintage posters by Ray Albano
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This collection of framed vintage posters by Ray Albano, who became curator of the Visual Arts department at the Cultural Center of the Philippines and then later on its director, is a graphic representation of the lively local art scene of the '70s. They also showcase Albano's proficiency not only in printing techniques, but also in putting together eye-catching graphic elements.

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"Sand Machine" by David Medalla

"A Stitch in Time" by David Medalla
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David Medalla explores the themes of travel, time, and chance in a fully interactive installation called "A Stitch in Time," right in the middle of The Link's fifth level. Viewers are encouraged to use the available needle and thread to sew small objects and pieces of textured cloth on the huge tapestryrepresenting the time they've spent on what's now a collaborative work.

"Coral Stress" by Olivia d'Aboville
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"Anthropocene" by Olivia d'Aboville

As promised, Olivia d'Aboville's environmentally-aware piece is very "in your face." In "Anthropocene," she lets the viewer imagine what it's like to be buried by layers of plastic through a set of planks made from sando bags and other plastic waste. According to scientists, waste is now deeply embedded in our planet's surface, so this scenario might not be too far from reality.

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"Subject/Object" by MM Yu

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MM Yu fills a whole room with photographs and objects that seem to be randomly arranged, but actually lay out what the Philippines' contemporary art scene is all about. You'll see a bamboo-made film projector that one associates with filmmaker Kidlat Tahimik, photos of galleries and exhibits, and a couple of balls of yarn. It takes some time digest all of it, but every bit is worth a careful look.

Since you have a full day, why not just check out all works by Art Fair Philippines' great lineup of featured artists? You can find all of them at the fifth level.

"Cheap Medicine" by Oscar Villamiel
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"Forest for the Trees" by Christina Quisimbing Ramilo

"Inferno, Purgatorio, Paradiso" by Ian Fabro
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"Tsismis" by Mauro Malang Santos

"Man with Violin" by Fernando Botero
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ArtFairPH/Photos

"Anonymity" by Poklong Anading (Silverlens Photo)

In this day and age when taking photographs seems to be second nature, Poklong Anading poses the irony of remaining anonymous. The person behind the lens has the option to not be seen, just because of the blinding flash of the camera. But since this a photograph of a photographer (in a very meta way), whose anonymity really remains?

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ArtFairPH/Talks

Reserve a seat for the art lectures and panel discussions, presented in partnership with Ateneo Art Gallery and Museum Foundation of the Philippines, during the three-day fair. There's a workshop on how artists and creatives can file their taxes (numbers, we know) on February 22 at 2 p.m.; a discussion on the art of Fernando Botero on February 23, 5 p.m.; and a plenary on the art of David Medalla on February 24, 5 p.m. For the rest of the schedule of ArtFairPh/Talks, check out Art Fair Philippines' website.

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Sixth Floor

MO_Space (Booth 12)

Flipping Out by Mariano Ching

Flipping Out by Duyan and Electrolychee
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Roberto Chabet's mixed media works are one of the highlights at MO Space, but we're pretty sure plenty of people will be fascinated by the collection of objects, part of the series Flipping Out curated by Juan Alcazaren, at the booth's entrance. Duyan and Electrolychee's geometric works are sure to catch your eye, as well as Mariano Ching's offbeat "snowglobes."

West Gallery (Booth 13)

"Dream Teeth" by Louie Cordero
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"Untitled" by Carina Santos (both top pieces); "Blooms" by Mona Santos (bottom piece)

The selection at West Gallery is a soothing break from the darker works of art at the fair, with Mona Santos' "Blooms" drawing your gaze almost instantly. It's paired perfectly with smaller pieces in similar palettes, both by Carina Santos. But the highlight is Louie Cordero's quirky "Dream Teeth," with its colorful, cartoon-like charm. 

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Galerie Stephanie (Booth 14)

"Inferno" by Anton del Castillo

Anton del Castillo's solo exhibit is a meditation on sinspecifically, as the exhibit notes enumerates, greed, sloth, pride, wrath, and envy. It's a juxtaposition of Biblical themes and dystopian characters, resulting in works that undeniably have the power to mesmerize.

Leon Gallery (Booth 24)

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Works by Leo Valledor and Nam June Paik

Color Theory, as the name implies, plays with the interactions of color. This exhibit presented by León Gallery, the Asian Cultural Council Manila, and Galería Cayón, showcases just that through the placements and combinations of the artworks. Color Theory is a demonstration of how prophet Josef Albers describes color, which to him is “quirky” and “even downright deceptive.” Make sure to check out Nam June Paik's “Tang Poetry on Color Bar,” which brings to mind television, Ang Kiukok's cubist painting “Door,” and Yayoi Kusama's “Nets Obsession,” which features the fields of dots that the artist is known for. 

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Silverlens (Booth 31)

"The Unraveling" by Patricia Perez Eustaquio

Silverlens’ diverse selection of artworks make it an ideal stop for fairgoers who seek variety. Marvel at Patricia Perez Eustaquio’s huge, digitally woven tapestry dubbed “The Unraveling,” John Santos' “Day by Day,” a quirky piece made of epoxy held up by a large metal clip, and Santiago Bose's mixed-media creation called “Leaving Baguio.” 

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Vinyl on Vinyl (Booth 33)

"Consequence" by Dennis Bato

Works by Demi Padua and Pinky Urmaza
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Situated front and center of Vinyl on Vinyl’s space in this year’s Art Fair is an installation of a thousand spray-painted, small resin figures that form a larger, singular figure of a man. This captivating work by Dennis Bato dubbed "Consequence” is just one of the highlights the gallery has to offer. Once you step inside, you’d find Demi Padua’s quirky take on found objects, Pinky Urmaza’s collages that evoke nostalgia, and more pieces that showcase colorful and eye-catching works of art.

CANVAS (Booth 45)

Art by John Paul Antido
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"Words Interconnected" by John Paul Antido

You're not likely to miss the CANVAS booth, with its fairytale trees flanking a mural that features a scene straight out of a magic-filled fable. The works insideall by John Paul Antidoare equally fantastical, and featured in a children's book entitled Looking for Juan. Purchasing a copy will benefit 1 Million Books for 1 Million Filipino Children.

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Art Bar

Looking for art books to add to your personal library? Swing by Art Bar’s booth and check out a wide selection of memoirs, coffee table books, artist-centric reads, as well as titles about art history and the technicalities of writing about the discipline. For budding artists, there are also art materials available for purchase such as Caran d'Ache pencils.

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Toby's Estate

Coffee lovers can take a break and stop by Toby's Estate for a flat white or cold brew. A bit hungry? You can order a piece of Bucky's on the side for a filling snack before you continue checking out the rest of the fair.

Seventh Floor 

Art Cube (Booth 40)

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From Finding the Light by Daniel dela Cruz

 

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In this time when people are more aware of the importance of mental health, Daniel dela Cruz's solo show at Art Cube is unflinchingly relevant. Sculptures with mobile phones for heads welcome viewers, and remind us how social mediaand everything that goes with itgreatly affects how we feel about ourselves. The rest of the show continues with sculptures exhibiting the different kinds of negative emotions that plague us. At the end of it, people can write notes for everyonea line that can make them smile or a phrase that can make life worth living.

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

Art Informal (Booth 42)

"An Apple a Day" by Winnie Go

Winnie Go's "An Apple a Day" series was the star of the show here during the Collector's Preview, and it's easy to see why. The colorful pieces are sure to be spotted on many stylish shelves in the years to come.

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Secret Fresh (Booth 50)

Art by Yeo Kaa

from Clusterf*ck by Christian Tamondong
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It's no surprise that the Secret Fresh booth is a psychedelic neon acid dream. It's divided into three areas (or maybe there's a fourth, but you didn't hear it from us): one is filled with tiles of Yeo Kaa's wide-eyed girl, one features the candyland-slash-Lego world of Christian Tamondong's Clusterf*ck, and one is worth checking out for its vinyl-fueled, New Wave and pop soundtrack. 

Salcedo Private View (Booth 59)

The Wonder Room
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The Wonder Room, curated by Stephanie Frondoso, lets you step into a world of wonder with glass pieces. Lilianna Manahan and Jiri Pacinek's series, in particular, shows bubble-shaped animals with glass flowers for their insides.

Boston Art Gallery (Booth 60)

Healing Grounds by Jim Orencio

Jim Orencio takes us to a world that we don't often see nowadays: Scenes of lush vegetation, a placid lake, and a lot of green. He matches this with a pile of dried leaves, which viewers can step on, listening to the crackling sounds they make. It not only hopes to heal a person who's constantly stuck in the fast-paced life in the city, but also the environment by raising awareness on how much we need this kind of space in our daily lives.

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Artbooks.ph

Artbooks.ph has a shop along Pioneer Street in Mandaluyong, but its appearance at Art Fair Philippines is perfect if you don't have the time to drop by that side of the city. It's a bookstore dedicated solely to arts and culture publications—which you don’t usually find at your favorite malls.

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BONUS: Artwork (4/F)

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Before you head out, make sure to stop by Artwork’s booth to purchase shirts, totes, or pouches as well as pins and notebooks. The brand collaborated with five visual artists—Doktor Karayom, Everywhere We Shoot!, Raffy T. Napay, Luis Antonio Santos, and Ryan Villamael—for their Arteest Series, a limited-edition T-shirt line for this year’s Art Fair.

#ArtFairPH in Three Hours

If you have almost half a day allotted for the Art Fair, then you roughly have an hour to wander around each floor. (Not counting the queuing time, of course!) Fair warning, though: It's easy to lose track of time and spend more than you can spare while looking at massive art installations. We list down the works that you need to see to give you an idea of how to go about your #ArtFairPH visit.

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Fifth Floor 

ArtFairPH/Projects

"Behold A City" by Ryan Villamael

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Ryan Villamael's "paper town" is a delicate depiction of Manila and its fragile beauty, with historic structures going neglected and falling into ruin. While it would be easy to take a quick glance and sum it up in a sentence or two, take a moment to appreciate the details and the painstaking work that clearly went into them. How many of the city's landmarks can you identify?

"Nung Gambalain Yung Sayawan" by Liv Vinluan
ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

Balancing whimsy with melancholy is no easy feat, but Liv Vinluan manages it in "Nung Gambalain Yung Sayawan"which, one should remember, is actually about history and how it constantly repeats itself. The images on the large vellum-paper canvas evoke a certain wistfulness, and that in itself is apt when you consider past mistakes you'd want to go back and correct.

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW
Vintage posters by Ray Albano

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

This collection of framed vintage posters by Ray Albano, who became curator of the Visual Arts department at the Cultural Center of the Philippines and then later on its director, is a graphic representation of the lively local art scene of the '70s. They also showcase Albano's proficiency not only in printing techniques, but also in putting together eye-catching graphic elements.

"Sand Machine" by David Medalla
ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

"A Stitch in Time" by David Medalla

David Medalla explores the themes of travel, time, and chance in a fully interactive installation called "A Stitch in Time," right in the middle of The Link's fifth level. Viewers are encouraged to use the available needle and thread to sew small objects and pieces of textured cloth on the huge tapestryrepresenting the time they've spent on what's now a collaborative work.

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

"Coral Stress" by Olivia d'Aboville

"Anthropocene" by Olivia d'Aboville
ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

As promised, Olivia d'Aboville's environmentally-aware piece is very "in your face." In "Anthropocene," she lets the viewer imagine what it's like to be buried by layers of plastic through a set of planks made from sando bags and other plastic waste. According to scientists, waste is now deeply embedded in our planet's surface, so this scenario might not be too far from reality.

Sixth Floor

MO_Space (Booth 12)

Flipping Out by Mariano Ching
ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

Flipping Out by Duyan and Electrolychee

Roberto Chabet's mixed media works are one of the highlights at MO Space, but we're pretty sure plenty of people will be fascinated by the collection of objects, part of the series Flipping Out curated by Juan Alcazaren, at the booth's entrance. Duyan and Electrolychee's geometric works sure to catch your eye, as well as Mariano Ching's offbeat "snowglobes."

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

Leon Gallery (Booth 24)

Works by Leo Valledor and Nam June Paik

Color Theory, as the name implies, plays with the interactions of color. This exhibit presented by León Gallery, the Asian Cultural Council Manila, and Galería Cayón, showcases just that through the placements and combinations of the artworks. Color Theory is a demonstration of how prophet Josef Albers describes color, which to him is “quirky” and “even downright deceptive.” Make sure to check out Nam June Paik's “Tang Poetry on Color Bar,” which brings to mind television, Ang Kiukok's cubist painting “Door,” and Yayoi Kusama's “Nets Obsession,” which features the fields of dots that the artist is known for. 

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

Silverlens (Booth 31)

"The Unraveling" by Patricia Perez Eustaquio

Silverlens’ diverse selection of artworks make it an ideal stop for fairgoers who seek variety. Marvel at Patricia Perez Eustaquio’s huge, digitally woven tapestry dubbed “The Unraveling,” John Santos' “Day by Day,” a quirky piece made of epoxy held up by a large metal clip, and Santiago Bose's mixed-media creation called “Leaving Baguio.” 

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

Vinyl on Vinyl (Booth 33)

"Consequence" by David Bato

Works by Demi Padua and Pinky Urmaza
ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

Situated front and center of Vinyl on Vinyl’s space in this year’s Art Fair is an installation of a thousand spray-painted, small resin figures that form a larger, singular figure of a man. This captivating work by Dennis Bato dubbed "Consequence” is just one of the highlights the gallery has to offer. Once you step inside, you’d find Demi Padua’s quirky take on found objects, Pinky Urmaza’s collages that evoke nostalgia, and more pieces that showcase colorful and eye-catching works of art.

Seventh Floor 

Art Cube (Booth 40)

from Finding the Light by Daniel dela Cruz
ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

 

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

In this time when people are more aware of the importance of mental health, Daniel dela Cruz's solo show at Art Cube is unflinchingly relevant. Sculptures with mobile phones for heads welcome viewers, and remind us how social mediaand everything that goes with itgreatly affects how we feel about ourselves. The rest of the show continues with sculptures exhibiting the different kinds of negative emotions that plague us. At the end of it, people can write notes for everyonea line that can make them smile or a phrase that can make life worth living.

Art Informal (Booth 42)

"An Apple a Day" by Winnie Go
ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

Winnie Go's "An Apple a Day" series was the star of the show here during the Collector's Preview, and it's easy to see why. The colorful pieces are sure to be spotted on many stylish shelves in the years to come.

CANVAS (Booth 45)

Art by John Paul Antido

"Words Interconnected" by John Paul Antido
ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

You're not likely to miss the CANVAS booth, with its fairytale trees flanking a mural that features a scene straight out of a magic-filled fable. The works insideall by John Paul Antidoare equally fantastical, and featured in a children's book entitled Looking for Juan. Purchasing a copy will benefit 1 Million Books for 1 Million Filipino Children.

Artbooks.ph

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

Artbooks.ph has a shop along Pioneer Street in Mandaluyong, but its appearance at Art Fair Philippines is perfect if you don't have the time to drop by that side of the city. It's a bookstore dedicated solely to arts and culture publications—which you don’t usually find at your favorite malls.

Secret Fresh (Booth 50)

Art by Yeo Kaa
ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

from Clusterf*ck by Christian Tamondong

It's no surprise that the Secret Fresh booth is a psychedelic neon acid dream. It's divided into three areas (or maybe there's a fourth, but you didn't hear it from us): one is filled with tiles of Yeo Kaa's wide-eyed girl, one features the candyland-slash-Lego world of Christian Tamondong's Clusterf*ck, and one is worth checking out for its vinyl-fueled, New Wave and pop soundtrack. 

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

BONUS: Artwork (4/F)

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

Before you head out, make sure to stop by Artwork’s booth to purchase shirts, totes, or pouches as well as pins and notebooks. The brand collaborated with five visual artists—Doktor Karayom, Everywhere We Shoot!, Raffy T. Napay, Luis Antonio Santos, and Ryan Villamael—for their Arteest Series, a limited-edition T-shirt line for this year’s Art Fair.

#ArtFairPH in 90 Minutes

It's not ideal, but some of us are just dropping by The Link during an hour-long lunch break or a few minutes after some major overtime at work. (Not everyone has the weekends off!) It's also possible that you'd get stuck lining up at the registration area. Don't despair, you have more than enough time to still enjoy the Metro's biggest contemporary art fair. Here are the must-not-miss pieces and where to find them.

Fifth Floor 

Vintage posters by Ray Albano
ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

This collection of framed vintage posters by Ray Albano, who became curator of the Visual Arts department at the Cultural Center of the Philippines and then later on its director, is a graphic representation of the lively local art scene of the '70s. They also showcase Albano's proficiency not only in printing techniques, but also in putting together eye-catching graphic elements.

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

"Coral Stress" by Olivia d'Aboville

"Anthropocene" by Olivia d'Aboville
ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

As promised, Olivia d'Aboville's environmentally-aware piece is very "in your face." In "Anthropocene," she lets the viewer imagine what it's like to be buried by layers of plastic through a set of planks made from sando bags and other plastic waste. According to scientists, waste is now deeply embedded in our planet's surface, so this scenario might not be too far from reality.

Sixth Floor

Vinyl on Vinyl (Booth 33)

"Consequence" by David Bato
ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

Works by Demi Padua and Pinky Urmaza

Situated front and center of Vinyl on Vinyl’s space in this year’s Art Fair is an installation of a thousand spray-painted, small resin figures that form a larger, singular figure of a man. This captivating work by Dennis Bato dubbed "Consequence” is just one of the highlights the gallery has to offer. Once you step inside, you’d find Demi Padua’s quirky take on found objects, Pinky Urmaza’s collages that evoke nostalgia, and more pieces that showcase colorful and eye-catching works of art.

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

Seventh Floor 

Art Cube (Booth 40)

from Finding the Light by Daniel dela Cruz

 

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

In this time when people are more aware of the importance of mental health, Daniel dela Cruz's solo show at Art Cube is unflinchingly relevant. Sculptures with mobile phones for heads welcome viewers, and remind us how social mediaand everything that goes with it—greatly affects how we feel about ourselves. The rest of the show continues with sculptures exhibiting the different kinds of negative emotions that plague us. At the end of it, people can write notes for everyonea line that can make them smile or a phrase that can make life worth living.

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

So, how many hours will you be at The Link this weekend—full day, just three hours, or a quick 90 minutes?

Photos and text by Christa I. De La Cruz, MM de Mesa, and Joanna Manalastas Calasanz

Art Fair Philippines 2019 runs from February 22 to 24, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. at The Link, Parkway Drive, Ayala Center, Makati City. For more information, visit Art Fair Philippines’ website.

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