10 School Things That Are Now Old-School

Once everyday objects, they're now practically part of history.

PHOTO BY War Espejo

(SPOT.ph) No matter how many years it's been since you’ve graduated, the mention of school can trigger a good dose of nostalgia. The thought of freshly starched uniforms, packed lunches, and back-to-school shopping brings up a lot of warm, fuzzy memories and makes us yearn for a simpler time. Of course, a lot of the everyday things that used to be part of our school days are now probably considered relics from the past. Do any of these sound familiar to you?

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Class presentations written on manila paper

If today’s kids can present their literature book reports through a PowerPoint deck, back in the old days we had to scrawl down our presentation on several sheets of manila paper. Bonus points if you used enough art paper and colorful markers to make your presentation look snazzy, and if the manila paper managed to stay taped on the board the entire time.

ILLUSTRATOR War Espejo

Rice paste

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If you're now pursuing a career in a creative field, you probably had arts period to thank for it. Besides the commonly used Elmer’s Glue, there was also the semi-solid white paste that could be bought in bulk and came in tubes for all your various art projects. Raise your hand if your seatmate snuck a taste of it when the teacher wasn't looking!

Floppy disks

Back when the computer was a fairly new and exciting invention, every student was required to bring a floppy disk to save their files. Big and square, the disk would fit perfectly in our binders yet had a memory capacity of only about one megabyte! 

ILLUSTRATOR War Espejo

Overhead projector

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Before LCD projectors and laptops were used in the classroom, our teachers and professors would normally whip out the overhead projector to make lessons more interesting. Admit it: You felt special when your teacher selected you to be the student in charge of changing the plastic slides.

Audio-visual cart

Few things would excite the whole class than when your teacher would wheel the Audio-Visual cart into your classroom. It didn’t matter what film or documentary you’d (be forced to) watch—the relative darkness of the room usually made everyone want to doze off.

ILLUSTRATOR War Espejo

Spanking rod

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Time was when nothing could keep you behaved in class more than the fear of getting hit by a rod. Students were always at their best behavior, or risked a sore rear end. Although this practice is thankfully a thing of the past, we've all heard the horror stories from our parents, aunts, and uncles.

Typing games and exercises

Today’s seven-year-olds can probably type without even teaching them how to. Years ago, schools would devote an entire class to teaching students how to use a computer. Besides learning the difference between hardware and software, there was also time for play in the form of games that focus on typing quickly, accurately, or both. Sometimes we could sneak in a game of Minesweeper, too. 

PHOTO BY War Espejo

Library card catalog

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Today, most library catalog systems are stored in an online database—students can search for the books they want to borrow with just a few taps and clicks. But back in the day, you would have to go through the dusty shelves of library cards to find your book. It’s extra frustrating when you go through all the work looking for a specific book only to find out that someone checked it out!

WordArt

In the late '90s and early 2000s, everyone used a formatting function in Microsoft Word called WordArt to add some pizzazz to their printed-out book reports and term papers. Everyone had their favorite WordArt style, whether it was the rainbow with a drop shadow or the gold gradient 3D option. Talk about #ahrt.

PHOTO BY War Espejo

Passing notes in class

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Before there were smartphones and messaging apps like Viber or Telegram, students would write on small pieces of paper, fold them up, and pass notes to each other in class—sneakily, or so we thought. We bet you also got caught by your teacher at some point. Or worse, you ended up having to read your note in front of the whole class as punishment! 

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