10 Vintage Holiday Print Ads

Before Facebook and YouTube ads, we had print ads.

 

(SPOT.ph) It’s that time of the year again, when brands and businesses try to catch your attention with heartwarming ads that exude the spirit of Christmas. In today's age dominated by technology and social media, advertisers take advantage of video as a medium to promote their products. But decades ago, they only had to rely on print material to deliver their message to their target audience.

 

Take a look at these vintage holiday print advertisements that will remind you of simpler times and age-old traditions.

 


 


 

Philip Morris

Philip Morris caught people's attention locally in 1955. For their Christmas ads, they used their memorable Johnny Bellhop boy who is based on an actual bellhop boy in New York named Johnny Roventini. This ad, published in 1965, shows the brand’s holiday greeting and new packaging.

 

Another print ad shows a parol and the Simbang Gabi tradition, in their efforts to localize their holiday advertisements.

 


 

Alaska and Daisy

When Alaska was just starting out and making a name for itself, it had an ingenious plan with its endorsers. Founder Wilfred Uytengsu Sr. thought that his children—Wilfred Steven, Candace, and Michaelshould also be the face of the brand. The kids appeared in several print ads for Alaska and its tetra pack counterpart Daisy in the '70s, including this holiday greeting.

 


 

Ang Tibay

Ang Tibay was a popular shoe brand from the Commonwealth era that had 17 outlets, including one along Rizal Avenue. Ang Tibay was such a hit that they were tasked to make the country's combat boots during the war, and even exported shoes to Hawaii. Their print ads were usually published in Graphic Magazine and some ads featured former presidents such as Manuel Quezon and Elpidio Quirino.

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Philippine Charity Sweepstakes

In 1961, even the lottery had to advertise their biggest Christmas sweepstakes draw of P500,000. They hired a fresh-faced Susan Roces, known back then as the Queen of Philippine Movies.

 


 

National Book Store

In the '50s, roughly 20 years after National Book Store opened its first stall in Escolta, founder Socorro Ramos decided to produce a line of greeting cards. She wanted the cards to feature scenic views of the Philippines as well as artwork by Filipino artists. This proved to be popular in the '60s especially during Christmas time.

 


 

White Plains

Residential developments in Quezon City were made affordable to the public in the '50s and '60s. White Plains and Blue Ridge capitalized on the breathtaking views of Marikina Valley. In this ad, it stated that downtown Manila was just 15 minutes away!

 


 


 

Coca-Cola and Pepsi

These ads by Coca-Cola and Pepsi both incorporated the use of a Christmas ball in their design. For Pepsi, which was published four years earlier, the Christmas ball simply showed their product. On the other hand, Coca-Cola focused on the moments spent with the family and the product.

 


 

Serg’s

Serg’s Products Inc. was built in the '50s by Anton Goquilay. Their popular candy bar Serg’s, named after Anton’s son Sergio, was an instant hit. In this holiday ad printed in Liwayway Magazine, they’re promoting their various sweets, which include a Breakfast Cocoa—the perfect drink on a cold Christmas morning.

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King Sue Ham, Piña Ham, Royal Ham

Noche Buena wouldn’t be complete without ham. King Sue has been in the Christmas ham business since the '30s and today, they have expanded to offer other products such as sausages, salami, tocino, and more. Piña Ham, on the other hand, was an imported, more upscale brand which sweet-cured their hams. Royal Hams, meanwhile, became the affordable choice for those who also wanted sweet-tasting ham.

 


 


 

Philips and PEMCO

Christmas in the Philippines is quite evident because of bright and colorful, holiday-decorated homes. Philippine Electrical Manufacturing Company or PEMCO and Philips were the leading manufacturers of colored bulbs in the late '50s up to the '60s. The companies also marketed them as "mood lights" when it wasn't Christmas time.

 

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