IMAGE Devi de Veyra

It’s Cool to Be Maarte: Tribal style, Pinoy pop + more finds at MaArte Fair 2016

The weekend bazaar is still a go-to destination for fans of Filipino brands.


 

(SPOT.ph) With today’s hippest Filipino brands rocking the refreshing new Pinoy style, it’s totally cool to be maarte. The recently concluded MaArte Fair at the penthouse of the Rockwell 8 building in Makati turned out to be a blockbuster success with more local brands showcased during the bazaar, held from August 26 to 28.

 

Tribal style dominated the scene with strong selections from both established and emerging brands. It’s become a hot trend with various contemporary expressions of the native beadwork and weavings applied to both fashion and home pieces.

 

Pinoy pop is having its moment as seen from the numerous caricatures and stylized depictions of cultural icons and other emblematic forms in shirts, dresses, bags, and even small furniture.

 

The MaArte Fair has become a favorite destination for hardcore patrons of local brands. It has also established itself as a platform for showcasing a fresh and dynamic contemporary design identity. Take a look at some of the beautiful pieces that we spotted at the fair.

 


 

Tina Lirag's dreamy beaded capelets for Romack Manila are perfect as last-minute wardrobe add-ons for formal and even casual evenings.

 

With its native materials and modern silhouettes, Adante Leyesa’s bags and costume jewelry encapsulate a modern Filipino style.

 

 


 

Anthill’s “Inang Tunic” (available at Tesoro’s, Tesoro’s Building, Arnaiz Avenue, Makati City) features native weaves and is chic enough to wear from day to casual nights out.

 

Colorful T’boli handwork adorns this Filip+Inna lined denim blazer.

 


 

Amarie’s embroidered cotton tops are perfect for our tropical weather.

 

You can walk about the city with Rizal in Lokal’s (0939-925-7053) white cotton shift with prints of cult icons, including the national hero.

 

 


 

An ordinary outfit can look stylish and current by simply adding Rhet Eala’s (894-1050) embroidered denim kimono to your mix of basics.

 

Barong Batik (0917-242-3963) gives traditional barongs a twist with batik accents.

 

 


 

This beaded leather Bagobo bag by Zarah Juan is simply adorable.

 

Go green with Halohalo’s pouch bags made from recycled plastic.

 

 


 

The Manila Collectible Co. showcased incredible native products including these collectible hand-painted bamboo tobacco containers made by the Bagobos’ last artisan trained in the craft (left) as well as this vibrant purple clutch bag (right).  

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Gifts and Graces Fair Trade Foundation works with communities that produce various handcrafted products such as the crocheted wallet with T’boli brass accent (left) and the envelope clutches (right).

 

 


 

Riqueza’s (0917-894-3115) fine jewelry such as pendants, earrings, and necklaces are reasonably priced.

 

Eccentrics (0917-844-7362) specializes in one-of-a-kind carabao horn jewelry.

 

 


 

At the fair, Natalya Lagdameo showed new collections such as the necklace with various pendants (left), and a new series that highlights the humble charm of pebble stones (right).

 

 


 

Milvida (0917-810-6207) specializes in fine crocheted products such as this charming lampshade.

 

La Pomme is a favorite among mothers with its stuffed toys and a new line of casual clothing for women.

 

 


 

A11 (0917-858-2610) was a popular stop for stylish homemakers with its showcase of various decorative objects such as these sculptural ceramic vases.

 

E.Murio’s signature cane furniture was on show as well and included this new rattan wall panel painted a medium gray.

 

 


 

Casa Mercedez’s fans are all the rage all over Manila. The company showed their new anahaw-shaped collections and another series inspired by landscape paintings.

 

An Mercado Alcantara’s adorable clay figures even come with their own little wooden houses.  

 

 


 

Joanique’s sequined clutch is the perfect way to spread some love. 

 

Erratum: An earlier version of this article attributed Tina Lirag's work to Bea Valdes. This has been corrected.

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