If I Die app allows Facebook users to schedule posthumous status updates

Mashable.com reports that Willook, an Israel-based company, has developed a Facebook application called If I Die, which lets you "post a final message to your wall and loved one when you're dead." No, there’s nothing supernatural about it.

Not morbid at all: If I Die’s ad features a cheerful voice-over and wry humor.

 

Mashable.com reports that Willook, an Israel-based company, has developed a Facebook application called If I Die, which lets you "post a final message to your wall and loved one when you're dead." No, there’s nothing supernatural about it.

 

Mashable.com explained how it works: "After installing the app, you choose three ’trustees’ (Facebook friends) who are charged with verifying your death. Users can then record videos or craft any number of Facebook posts to be published posthumously. When your trustees confirm your death, your messages can be published all at once to your Facebook wall or released on a designated schedule."

Willook co-founder and CEOEran Alfonta revealed that he got the idea for If I Die when "two of his married friends traveled to Italy without their children and narrowly escaped a fatal car crash with a truck." Alfonta explained: "They stopped aside and drank water and relaxed and started speaking between themselves: ’Oh my god, what would happen to the kids if something happened to me?’"According to the report, Alfonta’s friends then asked him to create a website where they could record something secret to their kids that would only be sent if they died.

 

Instead, Alfonta chose to develop a Facebook app because "it provided a way to verify your death with ’trustees,’ as well as guaranteed a delivery mechanism." Messages that are composed in advance can come out on a schedule. The Mashable.com cited this example: "When one user was diagnosed with cancer, she started recording videos for her daughter to be posted on her birthday every year until she was 18."

 

The report added: "If I Die currently only publishes to a user's public profile, but the team is working on features to allow for discrete messages and even messages that can be sent to people not on Facebook. Alfonta says the public postings will be free to use, though the discrete messages will work on an annual subscription model."

 

For more on this story, log on to Mashable.com.

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