Being an ’epalitician’ is now against the law

Under new rules released by the Commission on Audit, politicians who put their names and faces on tarpaulins announcing government projects can face administrative and criminal charges.

Under new rules released by the Commission on Audit, politicians who put their names and faces on tarpaulins announcing government projects can face administrative and criminal charges.

 

Michael Punongbayan of the Philippine Star reports the new rules on information and publicity for government programs and projects allow only relevant information on tarpaulins. "The display and/or affixture of the picture, image, motto, logo, color motif, initials or other symbol or graphic representation associated with the top leadership of the project proponent or implementing agency/unit/office, on signboards is considered unnecessary," the COA said.

 

The COA has also banned putting politicians’ names or logos on "equipment and facilities; vehicles of all type, whether engine, manpower or animal driven; wrappers, containers, and similar items; tokens, souvenir items, calendars, ballpens, t-shirts or other apparel, and other publicity materials."

 

Violating the guidelines could earn politicians administrative charges for unnecessary spending as well as criminal liability.

 

For more on this story, log on to PhilStar.com.

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