How to Visit Intramuros During the Pandemic

Don't forget to follow these health protocols.

intramuros
PHOTO BY Jerome Ascano

(SPOT.ph) Three sites in Intramuros, Manila, reopened to the public on February 17: Fort Santiago, Baluarte de San DiegoCasa Manila. But with the threat of COVID-19 still existing, visitors are asked to follow health protocols to keep everyone safe while visiting the historic landmarks. Only ages 15 to 65 are allowed to visit.

Here are the steps to follow when visiting Intramuros:

  1. Create a StaySafe.PH account on the StaySafe.Ph app, which is available on on Google Play and App Store.
  2. When you get to the site, scan the QR code with your app.
  3. Have your temperature checked.
  4. Don't forget to sanitize your hands every step of the way.
  5. Follow the markers on the ground to maintain physical of at least one meter.
  6. Cashless transactions are preferred via beep cards and PayMaya QR code, but the three spots are still accepting cash for the entrance fee (P75 for adults and P50 for students and PWDs).
  7. When you exit, you're again required to scan the QR code with your app.
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These sites in Intramuros are now open:

Fort Santiago

Sta. Clara corner General Luna Street
Open daily from 12 p.m. to 8 p.m. (last entry at 7 p.m.)
Entrance fee: P75 for adults, P50 for students and PWDs
Maximum capacity: 100 pax at a time

Fort Santiago, which was built in 1593, was one of the Spaniards' main defense lines. The dungeons served as storage for ammunition, until the Spanish soldiers realized that the place was too damp. When they built a new vault on higher ground in 1715, the underground site was converted into prison cells.

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Make sure that you have the StaySafe.ph app on your phone and scan the QR code upon entry.
PHOTO BY Jerome Ascano
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intramuros
Follow the markers to maintain physical distancing.
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intramuros
Security guards are still in guardia civil attire, but now sporting face masks and face shields.
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Temperature screening is contactless. All you have to do is raise your wrist in front of the thermal sensor.
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Hand sanitizer dispensers can be found practically everywhere.
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intramuros
It's hard to miss reminders about the protocols, such as wearing your mask and maintaining social distancing.
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The open areas are regularly disinfected.
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QR-code scanning is also required upon exit.
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Baluarte de San Diego

Sta. Lucia Street
Open every Saturday and Sunday from 8 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Entrance fee: P75 for adults, P50 for students and PWDs
Maximum capacity: 100 pax at a time

Known for its Instagram-worthy ruins, Baluarte de San Diego is an ace-of-spades shaped bastion that defended the Walled City and served as a watchpost for incoming ships at Manila Bay. It now also features the Healing Garden, which is exclusively open to all medical frontliners (with valid IDs) from Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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Baluarte de San Diego is an ace-of-spades bastion built on the southwestern corner of Intramuros.
PHOTO BY Jerome Ascano
intramuros
Don't forget to download StaySafe.ph since you will be using it a lot in Intramuros.
PHOTO BY Jerome Ascano
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Casa Manila

Plaza San Luis Complex, General Luna Street
Open from Tuesday to Sunday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Entrance fee: P75 for adults, P50 for students and PWDs
Maximum capacity: 15 pax at a time

Casa Manila, which was constructed in 1981, is a detailed reconstruction of an 1850s bahay-na-bato on Jaboneros Street in Binondo, Manila. It shows how Filipinos lived during the colonial era.

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Casa Manila was built in bahay-na-bato style.
PHOTO BY Jerome Ascano
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It shows a Filipino home during the Spanish colonial period.
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intramuros
Visitors are required to scan QR codes upon entry. Only 15 people are allowed at a time.
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Reminders are seen everywhere.
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