Antipolo's Biggest Art Museum Just Got Bigger

More reasons to check out Pintô Art Museum.

(SPOT.ph) Pintô Art Museum in Antipolo City, Rizal, is known for its several galleries all separated by doorways—thus the name. Enter one hall filled with massive canvases, such as Karnabal by Salingpusa Group, and you may eventually find your way into a pocket garden furnished with outdoor chairs and a sofa. For 2020, this sprawling compound founded by Filipino neurologist and patron of the arts Dr. Joven Cuanang just added a new wing: Gallery 7. It was opened to the public on January 2, with a special preview to members of the art community on December 31, following the 80th birthday celebration of its founder.

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The new 1,200-square-meter structure houses some of the most interesting works of art from the museum’s permanent collection, such as conceptual artist Nilo Ilarde’s installation of 22,425 die-cast cars, which was first seen at the Art Fair Philippines in 2018; an infinity installation by Mark Justiniani, who represented the country at the 58th Venice Biennale; and Martha Atienza’s Baloise Prize winning video "Our Islands."

Nilo Ilarde's installation was inspired by Douglas Huebler's radical 1969 statement, "The world is full of objects, more or less interesting; I do not wish to add any more." The artist, on the other hand, annotates: "Pinto Art Museum is full of objects, more or less interesting; I wish to add 22,425 more." 
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"Our Islands" by Martha Atienza
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There’s also Reen Barrera’s 11-foot “Ohlala Twin” and multimedia artist Lindslee’s clever life-like sculpture of a nude woman. In the middle of the gallery, a Ferdie Montemayor painting is displayed alongside Anton Del Castillo’s “Buenviaje.” Meanwhile, a plaque describing a forthcoming tower by Jose Santos III rests in an excavated part of the floor and invites guests to bring objects to complete its construction—adding a bit of interaction within the massive gallery. A wall on the second floor is dedicated to the masterpieces of Pintô Art Museum’s designer and curator, Antonio Leaño, who also co-founded the artist group Salingpusa.

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“Ohlala Twin” by Reen Barrera 
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Art by Guerrero Habulan
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John Santos III's interactive art tower
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Works by Jose Tence Ruiz, Toym Imao, Renato Habulan, Annie Cabigting, Lynyrd Paras, Rodel Tapaya, Marina Cruz, Guerrero Habulan, Otto Neri, Jaypee Samson, Cristina Escario, Dexter Sy, Japs Antido, Joven Mansit, Edrick Daniel, Shannah Orencio, Jeona Zoleta, Winner Jumalon, and the late Don Salubayba can also be viewed inside Gallery 7.

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"Pretty Ballads Hide Bastard Truths" by Miles Villanueva 
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Villanueva’s collage pieces from his show “What’s Left of It” are also on display. Each piece is made from collected glass shards that are then painted on and assembled.
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Robert Langenegger’s ingenious painting of an operating-room scenario depicting brain transplant surgery between a human and a pig—a tribute to the neurologist and Pintô Art Museum founder.
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Sculpture by Agnes Arellano
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Outside, museum-goers can marvel at Agnes Arellano’s sculptural installations, arranged like a shrine, giving the art hub an ethereal feel. A “Garapata” mural by Dex Fernandez covers a large wall as high as a two-storey building, which the artist completed just days before the opening.

Pintô Art Museum has become one of the more popular places to find contemporary art in the country, and was listed as one of the “World’s Most Instagrammed Museums” by ArtNet. For decades, it has become a place for young and established artists to connect with each other and a place where the public can access pieces that continue to define Philippine culture—staying true to its mission and vision of “bridging distinctive nationalities, worldviews, and communities” through art.

Pintô Art Museum is at 1 Sierra Madre Street, Grand Heights Subdivision, San Roque, Antipolo City, Rizal. It is open from Tuesday to Sunday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Admission fee is at P200.

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