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The Serious List: Your Guide to What to Watch Now

The must-watch titles to stream, based on what you want.

by the SPOT.ph team
Nov 10, 2020

(SPOT.ph) Raise your hands if you've ever spent more time searching for something to watch than actually watching. It's not exactly a problem, but allow us to offer a solution anyway: Here is SPOT.ph's ultimate guide to streaming! We round up the most exciting shows, series, and films to watch based on interests and whatever that happens to look real exciting at the moment. Enjoy watching! 

Skip to these lists and find your next binge-watch here:

LSS-Worthy Performances, Feel-Good, Sing-Along Moments + More: What We're Watching This Weekend
10 Things to Watch on Netflix If You're Into Mystery 
10 Things to Watch on Netflix If You're a K-Drama Fan
10 Things to Watch on Netflix If You Love Music 
10 Things to Watch on Netflix If You Love Food 
10 Things to Watch on Netflix If You Love Anime
A Scary Killer Clown, Asian Horror Flicks + More: What We Watched on the Weekend of December 5
Thrilling Heists, Action Comedies + More: What We Watched on the Weekend of November 28
Design Docus, Mysterious Disappearances + More: What We Watched on the Weekend of November 7
Feel-Good Holiday Films, Christmas-Themed Bakes + More: What We Watched on the Weekend of November 14
Korean Thrillers, a '90s Drama + More: What We Watched on the Weekend of November 7
A Netflix Gem, Animated Films With Feels + More: What We Watched At the End of October
A Thrilling Mystery, a Heart-Wrenching Movie About Exes + More: What We Watched on the Weekend of October 24

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LSS-Worthy Performances, Feel-Good, Sing-Along Moments, + More: What We're Watching This Weekend

If you're on the hunt for ideas for what to watch, what with all the streaming platforms available in the Philippines and their seemingly endless collections of shows and movies, check out our list of very subjective picks for this weekend.  Don't forget to make the popcorn! 

Mamma Mia! (2018)

Where to watch: Netflix

"Mamma Mia!, both the jukebox musical (1999) and film (2008), has been around for a while now. But it's always fun to watch it again and again while humming to ABBA's 'Chiquitita' and 'Thank You for the Music.' Watch for the grand 'Dancing Queen'scene, but you'll surely won't miss out especially with the whole ensemble singing and dancing on the screen." —Christa

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School of Rock (2003)

Where to watch: Amazon Prime and YouTube Movies

"School of Rock is one of those early 2000s movies I can watch over and over again and I won't get tired of it. I'm not a movie-musical kind of person (except for movies like High School Musical and this—which says a lot about the kind of person that I am. LOL!), but I definitely enjoy watching Jack Black's crazy character act as a music teacher and turns a group of kids into the coolest little rockstars for Battle of the Bands. Who could forget the impromptu math song his character taught the students? That's pretty iconic, if you ask me. I'm excited to watch this for the nth time this weekend! " —Jamie

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Anastasia (1997)

Where to watch: Netflix

"If you don't think the song 'Once Upon a December' is an absolute banger then you've probably never seen the animated masterpiece that is 1997's Anastasia—but not to worry, it's on Netflix. The film, which stars Meg Ryan in the titular role, is a fantastical take on the 1918 execution of the Romanov family of Imperial Russia complete with evil curses, talking animals, catchy tunes, and a way-too-creepy-for-cartoons depiction of the infamous mystic Grigori Rasputin. Trust me, this film is a blast to see (and sing along to) at any age."—Ashley

Eurovision Song Contest: The Story of Fire Saga (2020)

Where to watch: Netflix

"Fellow pop fans, you're in for a ride with Eurovision Song Contest: The Story of Fire Saga. It is an enjoyable, campy watch for those who grew up listening to '90s pop and buying compilation CD series like Now That's What I Call Music. The musical comedy tells the tale of two contest hopefuls who end up joining the annual singing competition participated by several European nations. Of course, the 'follow your dream' story angle adds to its appeal, but it's the songs that got me here. You'd end up having serious LSS with 'Volcano Man' (and its lyrics that I'm still trying to make sense of). And oh, 'Play 'Jaja Ding Dong'!'""—MM

The Prom (2020)

Where to watch: Netflix

"It doesn't get more musical-esque than Broadway. This is a pretty huge adaptation led by queer creator Ryan Murphy of the hilarious Broadway musical of the same name—and it stars Meryl Streep. Funnily enough, she takes on the role of a stage star past her prime (ironic, I know) who decides the only way to salvage her image is totally self-absorbed celebrity activism. She and her ragtag team of has-been friends head to a small town where a girl has been barred from attending prom with her girl friend. It's clearly over-the-top, self-aware, and bound to be hilarious—while also having something very important to say." —Mia

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La La Land (2016)

Where to watch: Netflix

"Musicals always sort of toe the line between being unforgettable instant classics and being just plain cheesy, and for me La La Land managed to place itself well away from the latter territory with its opening song—you know the one, with everyone stuck on the freeway spontaneously breaking into song. Besides, how could you not relate to a story about working hard to make your dreams come true and having to lose some things along the way?"—Jo

Hairspray (2007)

Where to watch: Youtube Movies

"I remember buying the Hairpsray soundtrack on a whim when it had just released. I adored the songs—and that was before I even knew what the movie was even about! Naturally, I had to watch the film (specifically this rendition), and instantly fell in love. Hairspray is set in the '60s and tells the story of Tracy Turnblad, a high school student (who happens to be plus-sized) who loves to dance and longs to join local dance television show The Corny Collins Show. The story includes themes of racial segregation and discrimination based on body size, which in the '60s were still prevalent and even normalized. Though we have a long way to go in overcoming racial and body size-related issues (they're still very relevant in this era, I think), the film does make you appreciate how far we've come today. That, plus the feel-good songs and dance sequences, make for an especially memorable film that I find myself watching to rewatch this weekend!"—Trish

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10 Things to Watch on Netflix If You're Into Mystery

PHOTO: BBC / Sherlock

Thought-provoking mysteries—whether fictional or not—have the power to keep you hooked from from start to finish. More often than not, solving just one mystery (or, more accurately, watching it get solved) is never quite enough and will likely leave you hungry for the next one. Get ready to put your detective skills to the test because there are a lot of puzzling and uncanny shows and movies to watch!

Dark (2017 to 2020)

Often compared to Stranger Things but undoubtedly brilliant in its own right, Dark is a German-language Netflix Original series that will have you watching from the pilot episode to the last. Children start disappearing without a trace in Winden, Germany, in 2019—just as they had back in 1986 and 1953, leaving the town shaken. Each episode reveals snippets of the town’s dark past and the secrets of the people living there, all entangled to form a mystery that spans three generations. Be warned: You’ll be left with more questions than answers the longer you watch.

The Chalet (2018)

Childhood friends reunite at a remote chalet in the small town of Valmoline for a wedding, but things take a turn when the bridge leading to the town collapses, isolating them from help. When sudden and mysterious “accidents” begin to take them out one by one, they realize they’re all in grave danger. Told in two timelines, each episode also reveal events that transpired 20 years ago, when a family of four suddenly disappeared from town without explanation, leaving viewers puzzling over what the past has to do with the present-day killings. This French thriller will keep you on your toes the whole time.

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Requiem (2018)

Though branded as horror, Requiem’s storytelling (despite what the trailer might suggest) veers away from using jump scares and instead makes use of brilliant storytelling and compelling visuals to reel you in. Matilda Grey’s (Lydia Wilson) life is turned upside down after her mother’s unexpected suicide. Still reeling from the shock and grief, she finds a box which contains press cuttings and a videotape relating to the disappearance of a four-year-old girl among her mother’s things. Intrigued, she sets out to find out more about the missing girl, aching to know how her mother might have been connected to it.

Sherlock (2010 to 2017)

There are many existing adaptations of Arthur Conan Doyle’s classic mystery novels featuring Sherlock Holmes, but this modern adaptation is a favorite for many. This British crime drama series is centered around the life of the eccentric but highly intellectual Sherlock Holmes (Benedict Cumberbatch) and his partner Dr. John Watson (Martin Freeman). Each episode follows different crimes, but the overarching plot relating to his nemesis Jim Moriarty (Andrew Scott) is one the main reasons people just can’t get enough of this series.

Se7en (1995)

Starring Brad Pitt and Morgan Freeman (need we say more for you to check this out?), Seven (stylized as Se7eN) is a 1995 neo-noir crime film centered around David Mills (Pitt), a rookie who partners with seasoned detective William Somerset (Freeman) to track down a serial killer, whose grisly murders appear to use the seven deadly sins as a motif. Fair warning: This is not for the faint-hearted.

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Searching (2018)

Timely for its rather genius use of technology, social media, and the Internet as a medium of storytelling, Searching is a thriller-mystery following David (John Cho) as he desperately searches for his missing sixteen-year-old daughter. A local investigation is opened, led by assigned detective Rosemary Vick (Debra Messing), but he decides to take matters in his own hands when no substantial progress is met. Through his daughter’s laptop, David follows her digital footprints in search for clues.

Fracture (2007) 

Fracture is a thought-provoking legal drama that focuses on a battle of wits between district attorney William Beachum (Ryan Gosling) and Ted Crawford (Anthony Hopkins), a wealthy aeronautical engineer who’s on trial for the attempted murder of his own wife. There’s a lot of legal jargon thrown around, but the baffling case and unexpected turn of events will have you scratching your head and rooting for Willy to solve it (if only for your own sanity).

Evil Genius: The True Story of America’s Most Diabolical Bank Heist (2018)

The documentary series sheds light on the a true crime story that shook the U.S. media in 2003: Pizza delivery man Brian Wells walked into a bank with a bomb strapped around his neck. He walked out after getting some cash but the explosive eventually detonated and killed him before the police had a chance to defuse it. Unpacking the real story behind the robbery—and how Wells ended up with a bomb latched onto him—Evil Genius is a fascinating documentary that's equal parts intriguing and disturbing.

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The Keepers (2017)

This seven-episode documentary explores the unsolved murder of a nun in Baltimore. Sister Cathy Cesnik taught at the Archbishop Keough High School. Her former students believe that her death had something to do with her suspicion that Father Joseph Maskell, along other priests at the school, was sexually abusing students. Digging into a web of corruption and injustice, The Keepers is a riveting seven-episode documentary with the power to remind you how unfair the world can be.

Conversations With a Killer: The Ted Bundy Tapes (2019) 

Perhaps there’s nothing quite as mysterious as the human mind, especially if it’s that of a serious killer as infamous as Theodore “Ted” Bundy. Often described as articulate, charming, and clean-cut, Bundy was a former law student who was convicted on the account of several sex killings, confessing—after more than a decade of denials—to 30 homicides between 1974 and 1978. Conversations With a Killer: The Ted Bundy Tapes tracks the different cases against him, revealing audio recordings from his conversations with a journalist before he was executed for his crimes.

10 Things to Watch on Netflix If You're a K-Drama Fan

PHOTO: Netflix / Kingdom

Gone are the days when we had to wait for each episode of a Koreanovela—as we used to call it back in the day—to air on TV daily. These days, we have streaming platforms that let us binge-watch for however long we want! It’s not surprising to know that many people find it hard to resist watching K-Dramas—the refreshing plots paired with great writing (and of course, cute oppas that breathe life into each story) offer so much more than your usual show. Korean series tend to be more popular here in the Philippines, but don’t be surprised when you get hooked by their films and variety shows, too. Here are some Korean content to get you started.

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Romance is a Bonus Book (2019)

Romance is a Bonus Book marks Lee Na Young’s return to the small screen (her last drama series being The Fugitive: Plan B in 2010) and Lee Jong Suk’s last drama before his military enlistment. Na Young plays Kang Dan-i, a struggling mother trying to get her successful career back after giving everything up to be a full-time mom. She applies for a job at a publishing company, where her longtime friend, Cha Eun Ho (Jong Suk) is a successful editor. The show explores the hardships of being a woman and the slow burn of falling in love with your best friend. It also gives us a taste of what fans would miss before the two-year Lee Jong Suk drought begins.

Kingdom (2018 to present)

Kingdom combines the thrill of an impending zombie apocalypse and the complexities of ancient royalty into one show that's totally worth losing sleep over. Based on the webcomic The Kingdom of the Gods, the series follows crown prince Yi Chang (Ju Ji Hoon, who also played the crown prince from Princess Hours). A political conspiracy aimed at keeping him from succeeding the throne forces him to flee the palace. As if he doesn’t have enough on his plate, a mysterious disease starts to spread across the kingdom and it might just spell out the end for humanity. Set in Korea’s Joseon period, Kingdom takes you on a thrilling journey as Yi-Chang fights for his birthrightand his life.

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Mr. Sunshine (2018)

If you’re looking for a cinematic experience in the confines of your bedroom—Mr. Sunshine is the way to go. The mere cinematography and visual effects are enough to make you binge-watch this series. Lee Byung Hun plays Eugene Choi: Born as a slave, he is forced to leave Korea and escape to the United States. He becomes a U.S. Marine soldier and returns to his birth country with a lot of pent-up resentment. Romance blossoms when he returns to Joseon and meets Go Ae-Sin (Kim Tae Ri), a nobleman’s daughter with a hunger for Korea’s freedom.

Memories of the Alhambra (2018)

After receiving a call about a new augmented-reality game, handsome CEO Yoo Jin-Woo (Hyun Bin) travels to the breathtaking city of Granada in Spain to meet game developer Jung Se Joo (EXO’s Park Chan Yeol). In Granada, he finds more than what he bargained for—a game so groundbreaking that the game developer has mysteriously gone missing. Instead of Se-Joo, he meets his sister Jung Hee Joo (Park Shin Hye). When a glitch in the game endangers their lives, Jin Woo and Hee Joo work to find Se Joo, who might be the only one who can save them. Fair warning: One episode at a time won’t be enough so be ready to binge-watch.

The Beauty Inside (2018)

Based on the 2015 movie of the same name, The Beauty Inside tells the story of a star with a secret: Every month, Han Se Gye (Seo Hyun Jin) suffers from a strange occurrence that causes her to appear as someone else. Being a popular actress with a penchant for trouble, rumors surround her when she suddenly disappears. What the public doesn't know is that she's just hiding in plain sight. She could be an old lady or a foreign man or even a young child—you name it, she's been one. This show tells the story of Se Gye and Seo Do Jae (Lee Min Ki), who suffers from face blindness, making it difficult for him to identify faces. You'll also be rooting for the secondary couple, Se Gye's friend Ryu Eun Ho (Ahn Jae Hyun), who wants to become a priest, and Do-Jae’s sister (Lee Da Hee).

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Something in the Rain (2018)

Hopeless romantics can take their pick from a wide selection of K-Dramas, but if what you're looking for is a slow-burning romance that feels a lot like real life, then Something in the Rain is the show for you. Yoon Jin Ah (Son Ye Jin) is a career woman struggling with her failed relationship and stressful life. Never did she expect her life to take a turn after reuniting with Seo Joon Hee (Joong Hae In), her best friend's younger brother who recently returned from a stint abroad. This realistic love story will have you rooting for the unlikely pair from start to finishif you're not too busy melting at the sight of Hae In's smile.

Okja (2017)

Okja is a heart-wrenching science-fiction movie featuring a multinational cast. It tells the story of a young girl and her beloved pet pig Okja, a genetically modified creature created by Mirando Corporation. The large company has been conducting different experiments to come up with a new breed of swine for consumption. Okja ends up in South Korea and becomes the companion of orphan Mija (Ahn Seo Hyun). Their simple life together is enough for her, but everything changes when the company returns to take Okja back.

Joint Security Area (2000)

Two North Korean militiamen are found dead in the demilitarized zone between the two Koreas, causing tension between the countries to rise. When Major Sophie E. Jean (Lee Young Ae) is tasked to investigate the incident, she uncovers an uncanny friendship between four border patrol men from the South and North that might help her solve the case. We don't want to spoil too much, but we suggest you bring a box of tissues and an open mind!

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Busted! (2018 to present) 

Busted! is a 10-episode variety show with a twist. The main cast—comprised of Yoo Jae Suk, Ahn Jae Wook, Kim Jong Min, Lee Kwang Soo, Park Min Young, Oh Se Hun, and Kim Se Jeong—play sleuths from different backgrounds, all chosen to be a part of the mysterious Project K. Each episode shows how they would showcase their strengths and solve urgent missions. You’ll root for each detective as they build their team dynamic and discover their abilities. This show will keep you watching thanks to the fun yet mind-boggling challenges presented in each episode. Don't forget to keep your eyes peeled for special guest stars from the Korean entertainment industry!

Men on a Mission (2015 to present)

Also known as Knowing Brothers Ask Us Anything, Men on a Mission is a must-watch variety show if you’re a fan of anything hallyu. Get to know your favorite K-Pop stars as they answer questions in a pseudo-classroom setting. Competing with the main cast (which includes Super Junior's Kim Hee Chul), guest stars of the show present themselves as "transfer students" from "rival schools." The cast tries to get know their guest through fun games like recounting funny and memorable anecdotes and making them guess what exactly happened. Who knows what secrets may be exposed? Episodes featuring your favorite stars from EXO, BTS, and Red Velvet are available for streaming, too.

10 Things to Watch on Netflix If You Love Music

PHOTO: netflix / homecoming

For those who love music, there’s also a multitude of choices on the service—from concert specials, documentaries about music, to  great films with equally great soundtracks. There are picks from different genres and unique artists all ready to share their music with the world. Here are some of them.

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Homecoming (2019) 

What more do you need to know besides this being billed as “A Film By Beyoncé”? If you want to know more, Homecoming is an in-depth look at singer Beyoncé’s history-making performance at the 2018 Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival, most especially the long, tough road it took to get there after cancelling her performance in 2017 due to her pregnancy. As the first African-American woman to headline Coachella, Queen Bey didn’t hold back and made powerful statements during her performance, and in Homecoming, audiences get to relive that, as well as take a rare peek at Mrs. Carter’s artistic process behind the scenes.

Taylor Swift Reputation Stadium Tour (2018) 

In what Netflix calls a celebration of "a monumental night of music, memories, and visual magic," this filmed version of Taylor Swift’s massive concert tour for her Reputation album isn’t just for Swifties. The music, the production, and Swift herself are worth watching as she sings and performs some of her recent hits such as "...Ready for It?" and "Look What You Made Me Do." This is Swift at her most daring, musically and as a performer, and it’s really incredible to see just how far she’s come since those sweet country-girl days.

FYRE: The Greatest Party That Never Happened (2019)

If concert documentaries aren’t what you’re looking for and instead, you want something a bit more serious but still related to music, FYRE would be your best choice. FYRE focuses on a failed "luxury music festival" in the Bahamas that the likes of Kendall Jenner and Bella Hadid promoted. Co-founded by Ja Rule, the Fyre Festival seemed doomed from the start as guests arrived to terrible accommodations and even worse food after being promised a five-star stay. This mess of a festival, how it came to be, and how it crashed and burned is all detailed in this wacky documentary.

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Hip-Hop Evolution (2016) 

Fans of hip-hop will love this documentary series that follows the genre’s rise from the 1970s all the way up to the boom in the 1990s and more. Interviews with hip-hop names like Sean "Diddy" Combs, LL Cool J, and Grandmaster Flash are mixed in with music and features on the Notorious B.I.G., Tupac, and the Wu Tang Clan. This in-depth documentary series about one of the world’s most popular music genres is led by rapper and journalist Shad as he digs deep into the history of hip hop. Once you’re done with this, also seek out the Jimmy Iovine and Dr. Dre-focused documentary The Defiant Ones for more hip-hop history viewing.

Pitch Perfect (2012)

Looking for something fluffier and lighter? Anna Kendrick and Rebel Wilson bring the laughs in the first (and best) installment of the Pitch Perfect series. Listen and watch as some of your favorite songs are broken apart and sung acapella in really cool or sometimes really hilarious ways. Kendrick’s version of "Cups" is legendary at this point, as well as the outstanding "riff off" scene. So if music documentaries and concerts aren’t what you’re looking for, you can find comfort in the shape of this really funny, really silly film about misfit acapella singers.

Gaga: Five Foot Two (2017) 

Lady Gaga lets her Little Monsters and other viewers into her life with little filter in this documentary that shows Gaga at her most vulnerable. Working through an album, preparing for her big Super Bowl performance, going through heartbreak, hilariously shopping at Walmart, dealing with Madonna, and yes, even getting the call that she will definitely be starring in Bradley Cooper’s A Star is Born remake are all documented in this revealing film. The documentary notes that you’ve never seen Gaga like this before, and they aren’t lying.

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How the Beatles Changed the World (2017)

Sometimes you’re going through Netflix looking for a throwback, and there’s no greater throwback than following the footsteps of The Beatles. One of the biggest and most iconic musical acts in history, The Beatles have had several documentaries and projects that talk about their rise, their fame, and their music. But in this documentary, rare footage and tons of interviews focus on the cultural phenomenon that was the Fab Four. 

Foo Fighters: Back and Forth (2011) 

Producers combed over 1,000 hours of footage—both historical and new—to create this self-proclaimed "rockumentary" about one of the most popular 1990s American rock bands the Foo Fighters. Frontman Dave Grohl as well as current and former members of the band talk about the storied history of the band, how it started, and how it has evolved over the years. At the time, the band was making a "garage record" which seemed unheard of for a band of this stature but, as the documentary points out, there’s a feeling of going back to their roots and exploring the Fighters’ history. 

Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist (2008)

A fake boyfriend, a missing drunk friend, and a wild night out in New York City searching for their favorite band's secret gig make up the base for this funny and frantic rom-com starring Kat Dennings and Michael Cera. Cera plays a heartbroken bass player who keeps making mixed CDs for his ex-girlfriend. Dennings plays the girl who finds these CDs and connects with Cera's taste in music. Their love for the same tunes unite them in a very 2008 but still very lovely little love story.

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Whitney (2018)

Whitney Houston is such a major figure in music but her troubled life and career have been the subject of many documentaries. 2018’s Whitney, however, is the only one authorized by the late singer’s estate. This 2018 film is as candid as can be, as archival footage and interviews with Whitney’s loved ones try to showcase the work that Houston produced, while not shying away from all the struggles and terrible things she faced during her life. This is as much a portrait of a star taken by a disease as well as a celebration of her music.

10 Things to Watch on Netflix If You Love Food

PHOTO: Netflix / Somebody Feed Phil

Who doesn’t love watching food get made? From the preparation to the cooking to the actual eating, there’s something so mesmerizing about food. Watching it on a screen though, when technology is not yet advanced enough for us to reach in and grab a bite, can be excruciating. Still, that doesn’t stop us from binge-watching food flicks and shows—cravings be damned. 

Chef's Table (2015 to 2019)

Six seasons in (plus a France spin-off), Chef’s Table continues to wow audiences with its cinematic look behind the world’s most delectable plates. Each episode focuses on one chef’s story, starting with Massimo Bottura and his restaurant, Osteria Francescana in Italy. Season four is all about pastries, and particularly notable is the pure joy in Christina Tosi’s episode featuring her Milk Bar in New York. Created by the director of acclaimed documentary movie Jiro Dreams of Sushi, David Gelb, this show will make you want to reach into the screen for a bite (or 10).

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Street Food (2019)

From the creators of Chef’s Table comes another food documentary series that will bring on the cravings. Instead of fancy, cutting-edge restaurants, the new series focuses on the humble yet universally loved street food. The debut season showcases the street food of Asia, from one chef’s unique tom yum soup and Michelin-starred crab omelets in Bangkok, Thailand to the fish head soup and goat stew of family-owned street stalls in Chiayi, Taiwan. The finale is our very own Cebu, where lechon, tuslob-buwa (Cebuano fondue), and nilarang bakasi (sour stew with reef eels) take center stage. 

Jiro Dreams of Sushi (2011)

The 2011 documentary film that inspired the aesthetic of Chef’s Table captures the art and magic behind Jiro Ono’s world-renowned sushi. Chef’s Table creator David Gelb films the shokunin (sushi craftsman) in his 10-seater, three Michelin-starred restaurant, Sukiyabashi Jiro, located in a Tokyo subway station. The movie explores Jiro’s relationship with his family, particularly his two sons: Yoshikazu, who works with him at Sukiyabashi Jiro, and Takashi, who handles a branch in another Tokyo spot.

Ugly Delicious (2018 to present)

A tasty contrast to the polished aesthetic of Chef’s Table, Ugly Delicious is a more humorous, irreverent look at "culinary rebels" around the world. Each of the eight episodes focuses on one dish or style of cooking, as interpreted by different chefs and cultures. David Chang, founder of the famous Momofuku restaurant group in New York, hosts the series and invites famous personalities to dine with him, such as The Walking Dead’s Steven Yeun and comedians Ali Wong and Aziz Ansari.

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Salt Fat Acid Heat (2018)

A food and travel documentary unlike any other, Salt Fat Acid Heat gets its unique flavor from host Samin Nosrat, whose pure, unapologetic love for food is only matched by her tireless pursuit of flavor and knowledge. She travels from Italy to Japan to Mexico to her home in California to delve into the four elements that make up great cooking: Salt, fat, acid, and heat. What makes the food look even more delicious is Samin’s almost childlike joy in savoring every bite. The four-part series will leave you wanting more—good thing her 2017 book of the same name is available in local bookstores.

Cooked (2016)

While Samin Nosrat focuses on the four elements that make up great cooking in Salt Fat Acid Heat, food writer Michael Pollan turns to a different kind of foursome. In Cooked, he explores how fire, water, air, and earth create food. The Air episode talks about bread making and the nature of gluten, while the Earth episode shows how fermentation turns unassuming raw ingredients into delicacies. Pollan says that humans have powerful memories associated with cooking and it is our job to unlock and preserve them for future generations.

Somebody Feed Phil (2018)

In this food and travel series, host Phil Rosenthal follows his taste buds around the world, from Bangkok to Tel Aviv to New York City. There are already two seasons, charmingly called The First Course and The Second Course. The jovial host who likes cracking tito jokes is also the creator of the famous sitcom Everybody Loves Raymond and the host of 2015 food series I’ll Have What Phil’s Having.

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The Mind of a Chef (2012 to 2017)

The late Anthony Bourdain narrated and produced four out of five seasons of this series that explores the cooking philosophies of different chefs. Unlike most shows now that feature one chef per episode, the series spends several episodes with a chef or a pair of chefs. You’ll see a young David Chang, now the host of Ugly Delicious, as the sole focus of season one. Netflix picked up the show after it aired on PBS and the show has won several Daytime Emmys including Outstanding Culinary Program.

Flavorful Origins (2019)

Flavorful Origins focuses on Chaoshan cuisine, which originates from the Guangdong province in China. Learn about the different ways olives are preserved, the ingredients of a typical Chaoshan brine, and the history behind the traditional tofu cake. With episodes that are less than 15 minutes each, you’ll breeze through this series.

Martha Bakes (2011 to present)

Love baking? Consider this series your very own home tutorial with culinary icon Martha Stewart. She shares pro-level techniques and recipes in two out of eight seasons available on Netflix. Learn how to make traditional Danish pastries, whip up interesting creations using coffee and green tea, and bake celebratory cakes that will steal the scene at any party. Designed for home bakers, the show also features guests like acclaimed pastry chef and chocolatier Jacques Torres, who teaches you how to make all sorts of magic using chocolate. Just starting out? There are also beginner-friendly episodes like One Bowl Desserts, where baking is easy as pie. Sweetening the deal? Since you’re just using one bowl, cleaning up will be a piece of cake!

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10 Things to Watch on Netflix If You Love Anime

PHOTO: medialink / haikyu!!

Remember the days when you had to call dibs on the TV—and fight for the remote control if you had to—just to watch the latest episode of whatever anime was airing on local channels? Back then, it was the only way we could get our daily dose of anime, but the times have changed and now, you can easily watch from online streaming platforms. Check out these shows and movies, anime fans!

Violet Evergarden (2018)

This 13-episode series takes you on a journey with the titular character Violet, a young girl formerly known as “the weapon,” as she struggles to integrate herself back into society now that the war is over. She takes on the role of an Auto Memory Doll, who ghost-writes for people who can’t quite put their emotions into words. Praised for its gorgeous animation, Violet Evergarden is a melancholic watch that’s bound to make you tear up as Violet confronts happiness, grief, love, and more through other people’s lives.

Your Lie in April (2015)

Piano prodigy Kousei Arima is known as a “Human Metronome” for being able to play each piece perfectly and according to the score. When his strict mother—who is also his instructor—passes away, the shock causes him to become tone-deaf and stop playing the piano. Two years later, he meets Kaori Miyazono, a violinist who performs however she wants to without much care for the musical score, and bit by bit, she brings music back into his life.

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Haikyuu!! (2014 to 2020)

There’s nothing like a good sports anime to motivate you to try out your dream sport—or to make you want to learn a new one completely. Whether you’re a volleyball fan or not, you’ll find yourself rooting for Shoyo Hinata, who dreams of becoming a great volleyball player despite his height. He tries out for the team in his new high school, a team that was once great but is no longer of the same calibre. Together with his new friends, Hinata moves forward to bring the team back to its former glory.

Orange (2016)

High school student Naho receives a strange letter from her future self, advising her not to invite the transfer student out on his first day. The letter claims that doing so would be one of her biggest regrets in life. She decides to ignore it, thinking there’s no way it can be real, and when Kakeru arrives at her school, she and her friends take him out—only to later learn it could lead to them losing their new-found friend in the future. The letters continue arriving, and soon Naho realizes she has to believe in them to stop whatever is bound to happen to Kakeru.

Children of the Whales (2017)

Chakuro knows nothing about the world beyond the Mud Whale, a vast ship that aimlessly wanders the sea of sand. It’s the only home he’s ever known and he grows up with a small community, whose population is split into the Marked, who can control magic at the expense of shorter lifespans, and the Unmarked, who have longer lifespans but no ability to harness magical energy. Life is peaceful until they come across a newly sighted island, where they find a mysterious girl. They soon learn the horrors of the outside world—and the truth behind the Mud Whale and their aimless drifting.

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A Place Further Than the Universe (2018)

This fun, albeit rather unrealistic (but hey, it’s anime, after all) slice-of-life series follows four high school girls and their adventures as they head to Antarctica. Mari Tamaki has always wanted to make the most of her youth but never had the guts to step out of her comfort zone—until she meets Shirase Kobuchizawa, whose infectious energy convinces Mari to travel with her to Antarctica in search of the latter's missing mother. Together with Hinata Miyake and Yuzuku Shiraishi, they do everything they can to reach Antarctica, forming a bond as they struggle past obstacles together.

Shirobako (2014 to 2015)

This series, albeit fictional, gives you a glimpse of what it’s like for the people behind your favorite anime. After making their first amateur anime in high school, five girls vow to one day work together to create their own mainstream show...except things don’t really go as planned. Aoi Miyamori and Ema Yasuhara manage to land a job at a big animation studio, but quickly realize there’s still more for them to learn. Midori Imai is still pursuing her dream to become a writer; Shizuka Sakaki is struggling to be recognized as a talented voice actress; and Misa Toudou finds herself in an unsatisfying job designing 3D models of cars. The five girls strive to reach their dreams and learn that the road to success is not an easy one.

Aggretsuko (2018)

You probably loved watching Doraemon because it perfectly captured the nuances of your childhood. Chances are, you’ll find Aggretsuko a fitting mini-series for your “adulting” feels. Comic and satirical, this show follows the daily life of Retsuko, a seemingly meek red panda working as an accounting clerk, often overworked and abused by her seniors. She releases all her frustrations by singing death metal songs on karaoke nights.

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Flavors of Youth (2018)

This Japanese-Chinese co-production is an anthology drama film told in three chapters. Coming from the studio that gave us Your Name, Flavors of Youth explores the simple joys—and hardships—of mundane life, growing up, and childhood love. Each story unfolds with an unhurried pace, giving us plenty of time to take in not only each moment, but also its excellent animation. The gorgeously animated backgrounds feature three different cities of China.

Big Fish & Begonia (2016)

You may not be used to watching Chinese animated films, but you wouldn’t want to miss this one. Big Fish & Begonia is a magical and moving tale that takes viewers into a dream-like fantasy reminiscent of Studio Ghibli’s signature films. Based on ancient Chinese legends, the film follows a young girl named Chun, who comes from a mystical race of beings that can control the tide. When she turns 16, she is allowed to transform into a red dolphin and explore the human world. When a human boy dies from saving her, she decides to repay his kindness by giving away part of her soul to resurrect him—but her sacrifice comes at a much higher price, and the rest of the world seems to be paying for it.

Missed our previous streaming lists? Here are more suggestions from us on what to watch—you know, in case you couldn't decide still on what to stream. You're welcome.

A Scary Killer Clown, Asian Horror Flicks + More: What We Watched on the Weekend of December 5

ILLUSTRATION: War Espejo

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Aurora (2018)

Where to watch: Netflix

"I'm not a big fan of horror films, but 2018 Metro Manila Film Festival entry Aurora seems intriguing enough to merit a watch. It's title comes from the fictional ship that crashes on a rocky coast where innkeeper Leana (Anne Curtis) lives. And in true horror fashion, she sees dead people." —Christa

The Shining (1980)

Where to watch: Netflix

"It’s been a while since I last watched a horror movie that really scarred me for life. And when it comes to hair-raising, spine-tingling films, nothing—literally, nothing—beats Stanley Kubrick’s masterpiece The Shining based on Stephen King’s novel of the same name. So, when I saw that it’s on Netflix, I figured now might be good time for a rewatch, considering that life in general’s got me feeling numb these past few weeks. In case you need a refresher, The Shining is a 1980 classic horror movie that centers on the life of Jack (Jack Nicholson),  a writer who moves into a remote hotel where he gets hired as “winter caretaker.” The hotel stays closed during winter months, so Jack planned to use the peace and quiet to write—or so he thought. You probably already know that this hotel has got some bad juju—its previous caretaker murdered his family and then killed himself inside the hotel, but this information didn’t faze Jack at all. Just talking about it is giving me flashbacks of some of the creepiest scenes that have been embedded in my brain the first time I watched this film! The fact that it's both effectively horrific and beautifully shot makes it the perfect horror movie for my taste. It's got some pretty relatable lessons, too: 'All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.' Wink, wink." —Jamie

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Truth or Dare (2018)

Where to watch: Netflix

"I should probably state right off the bat that Truth or Dare isn't the film to watch for true-blue horror fans looking for masterful cinematic techniques. But hey, if you're a bit of a scaredy cat like me, you'll find that this movie has both its fair share of jump scares (so you can at least say you braved your way through a horror flick) as well as a pretty silly plot that's enough to keep you from creating terrifying scenarios in your head—it might even make you giggle. In a nutshell, the film follows a group of friends who are lured into a game of truth or dare that proves deadly for those who lie or don't follow the rules—no, seriously."—Ashley

The Call (2020)

Where to watch: Netflix

"The Call, as it is, looks like a glossy horror with a little throwback element in the form of landline calls. It actually does seem like an homage to the Asian horror movies in the early 2000s that involved missed calls and things you should avoid using, else the creepy being will stalk you to death. I'm intrigued with its time-travel aspect as the two lead characters live in the same house, 20 years apart, but they only communicate via phone. Just typing those words gives me the goosebumps."—MM

It (2017)

Where to watch: HBO Go

"I remember seeing the 1990 version of this as a kid and then going on a Stephen King horror novel reading spree—I don't know what I was thinking, honestly—but I liked IT along with Pet Sematary, so wanted to see if I'd enjoy the remake too. This version's Pennywise looks scarier for sure, and it's always fun to watch a good twist on the old trope about a group of friends taking on an adventure together. Even if that adventure involves a demented killer clown."—Jo

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Shutter (2004)

Where to watch: Netflix

"I first saw Shutter as a fourth-grader back in 2004, and being young, I didn't fully understand the movie—I mostly remembered it for the jump scares. I especially did not fully comprehend the real reasons for all the haunting going on in the movie, which (spoiler alert) have to do with rape. I thought I'd revisit it now that I'm 26, as I'll be mentally better-equipped to appreciate the story (though I'd probably still be freaked out by the jump scares!)"—Trish

#Alive (2020)

Where to watch: Netflix

"Nothing like a zombie flick to get the heart racing. Strictly speaking, it's not a horror film but, unfortunately, the idea of a disease spreading through the world and taking out the human race just hits a little too close to home right now. #Alive was a huge blockbuster hit when it dropped in South Korean cinemas in June—an impressive considering we were at the height of the pandemic then. It follows two neighbors, Joon Woo (Yoo Ah In) and Yu Bin (Park Shin Hye), as they pair up and fight for survial as the outside world—and all our modern forms of communication—falls apart. Who knows? If it ever really happens, I might pick up a few things from the movie." —Mia

Thrilling Heists, Action Comedies + More: What We Watched on the Weekend of November 28

PHOTO: Official stills ILLUSTRATION: War Espejo

The Purge: Anarchy (2014)

Where to watch: Netflix

"I found out recently that the sequel to the 2013 hit The Purge is actually on Netflix. Now, I can stress myself out while watching the citizens of the 'New Founders of America' run around the streets and try to kill or be killed. Nothing like a heart-stopping film to relax you on a weekend, amirite? Plus, judging from the title, it looks like there's a hint of social issues on this one." —Christa

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Extreme Job (2019)

Where to watch: Netflix

"I've heard a lot of good things about Extreme Job so I'm excited to finally get to sit down and watch it. The story revolves around a group of narcotics detectives who end up running a chicken joint to remain undercover as they try to take down a gang of organized criminals. But, it turns out, their little eatery becomes the talk of town, with customers pouring in left and right all day long! The success of their chicken joint may or may not affect their efforts in taking down a high-profile gang. Don't be fooled by its silly comedy, though, because there's some pretty thrilling action scenes that prove that they're just as stellar as detectives as they are as chicken-joint runners."—Jamie

Charlie's Angels (2019)

Where to watch: Netflix

"I was a huge fan of the Charlie's Angels film series in the early 2000s, so I was immediately excited for the 2019 reboot—especially with an all-star cast that includes Kristen Stewart, Naomi Scott, and Ella Balinska as the new generation of Angels working for a private detective agency. Not to mention, the banger lead single from the film's soundtrack, "Don't Call Me Angel," was also performed by three badass women (namely, Ariana Grande, Miley Cyrus, and Lana Del Rey) and was enough to get me pumped for the premiere. All in all, the film is lots of fun with a great mix of action, comedy, and nonstop girl power from start to finish."—Ashley

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Baby Driver (2017)

Where to watch: HBO Go

"You know you're in for a ride when the movie leaves you breathless in its first few minutes, which is how I remember Baby Driver to be when I got to watch it on the big screen in 2017. Ansel Elgort plays getaway driver Baby who suffers from tinnitus. As such, he's almost always wearing a pair of earphones to drown out the ringing in his ears. What makes it different from all the other action and heist films is how in sync the music is with the action. According to sound designer Julian Slater in a DigitalTrends interview, the songs in the movie were 'tempo-mapped, where you map out the tempo to any given point in the music. I'd be on the lookout for these moments when I rewatch!'"—MM

The Thieves (2020)

Where to watch: Netflix

"Overly convoluted heist? Kooky characters played by an awesome ensemble cast?  Glamour? Action? Adrenaline? Trrriple check! Call me predictable but who doesn't love a good, vicarious thrill. The Thieves is a South Korean heist movie that stars the always-charming Gianna Jun as a professional burglar (if you can even professionalize that career path). She joins forces with a gang of other sketchy characters to pull off an epic heist in the gambling capital of Macau. The movie is currently the sixth highest-grossing film in South Korean cinema's history so I can't wait to see whether it lives up to the hype." —Mia

Blade Runner 2049 (2017)

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Where to watch: HBO Go

"Yes, this movie is kind of old, but I've never seen it and it has such a rich backstory I can't wait to read more about it after watching. Ever heard of the 'Blade Runner Curse'? Apparently both Pan Am and Atari were victims of it, being two of the companies that folded soon after being featured in the original Blade Runner."—Jo

The Sleepover (2020)

Where to watch: Netflix

"The Sleepover is an action-comedy film focusing on two siblings who discover their seemingly regular-housewife mom Margot was once a thief in witness protection. Margot and her husband Ron are suddenly kidnapped by her former employer—leaving the kids with no choice but to team up with their friends and save their parents. The trailer is hilarious; plus, sometimes I find myself looking for something that's easy to watch but still delivers on the thrill factor—and this seems to fit the bill."—Trish

Design Docus, Mysterious Disappearances + More: What We Watched on the Weekend of November 21

PHOTO: Show stills courtesy of Netflix ILLUSTRATION: War Espejo

Challenger: The Final Flight (2020)

Where to watch: Netflix

"On January 28, 1986, American space shuttle Challenger exploded 73 seconds after launch—killing seven crew members aboard the spacecraft that completely broke apart in the sky for the whole world to see. One of them was Christa McAuliffe, who was supposed to be the first high school science teacher in space and tasked to bring back the public's excitement towards space exploration. This four-episode docuseries reveals what happened behind this tragic incident. (Clue: Politics and bureaucracy)." —Christa (actually named after Christa McAuliffe)

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Don't F*ck With Cats (2019)

Where to watch: Netflix

"I've always been into true-crime documentaries—I usually find those scarier than horror movies because these things actually happen in real life. Don't F*ck With Cats came quite some time ago but I haven't really gotten the chance to really sit down and watch it. I've heard how it deals with tracking down the serial killer by means of extreme stalking done by a large number of people via the Internet—and to be honest, that sounds like my kind of show. I can't wait to finally watch it this weekend!"—Jamie

Abstract: The Art of Design (2017 to 2019)

Where to watch: Netflix

"I'll be honest—I know very little about design in almost every form, but I got hooked on Netflix's documentary series Abstract: The Art of Design as soon as I started watching. The first episode of the series features German illustrator Christoph Niemmann whose work has been featured on the cover of The New Yorker, Atlantic Monthly, and The New York Times Magazine. Niemann shares the process, inspiration, and philosophy behind his art and more importantly, shows how art in all forms is inextricably connected to modern culture and human nature itself. The episodes that follow perform a similar service, but with artists from other fields like fashion, footwear design, photographer, and more. It's surprisingly feel-good, down-to-earth, and nothing less than inspiring at every turn."—Ashley

The Social Dilemma (2020)

Where to watch: Netflix

"With everything that's been happening around us, a lot of the blame goes to how people use social media. This documentary goes into the world of social networking and how things operate from the companies' perspective, which may actually have problematic consequences to end users. When this first came out in September, conversations about changing social media habits (if not eradicating them completely) became very rampant. It would be interesting to see what exactly are the things that have made people talk about evaluating how they use their social platforms. "—MM

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Secrets of the Saqqara Tomb (2020)

Where to watch: Netflix

"To be clear, basically everything I know about Egypt I learned from The Mummy series and a couple of books I had as a kid, so when the Saqqara banner popped up on my screen I knew I had to watch it—if only to confirm that not all Egyptologists look like Rachel Weisz. On a more serious note, who wouldn't be interested in the secrets of the ancient? This documentary on an archeological dig in one of Egypt's numerous necropoli looks like a good start for a newbie like me.  " —Mia

In Vogue: The Editor's Eye (2006)

Where to watch: HBO Go

"I happened to spot this documentary while browsing aimlessly through films in HBO Go and bookmarked it—the inner workings of Vogue have always fascinated me, mostly because they seem like such a well-oiled machine. The film was produced to coincide with the magazine's 120th anniversary and features art directors past and present. I love hearing from powerful women who aren't afraid to stick to their vision for their brand, despite the odds."—Jo

The Disappearance of Madeleine McCann (2019)

Where to watch: Netflix

"This documentary revolves around exactly what it says—the disappearance of Madeleine McCann, a then-three year old who vanished while on holiday with her family in Portugal in 2007. It's been 13 years since the incident and sadly, Madeleine has yet to be found. Interestingly, it's been said that the McCann parents themselves declined to be part of the documentary. I'm interested to see what insights the eight-part documentary might provide nevertheless."—Trish

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Feel-Good Holiday Films, Christmas-Themed Bakes + More: What We Watched on the Weekend of November 14

ILLUSTRATION: War Espejo

The Holiday (2006)

Where to watch: Netflix

"The best holiday movies involve some element of magic or fantasy—by fantasy, I mean wishful thinking, and what else fits squarely into that category than the idea of swapping lives with someone across the ocean for a week? Okay, technically Kate Winslet and Cameron Diaz just swapped homes, but they might as well have exchanged lives, too. If you haven't seen this Nancy Meyers classic, get ready to add to your long list of favorites, and if you have, wouldn't this weekend be a good time to soak in a movie that's meant to give you the warm and fuzzies?"—Jo

Operation Christmas Drop (2020)

Where to watch: Netflix

"Holiday-themed movies often border on cringey rom-com territory, but I'm hoping that Operation Christmas Drop won't disappoint. Set in Guam, it follows the love story of polar opposites Erica (Kat Graham) and Andrew (Alexander Ludwig). Erica is assigned to investigate (and shut down) a U.S. Air Force base in Guam, and Andrew tries to change her mind."—Christa

Sugar Rush Christmas (2019)

Where to watch: Netflix

"It's been a while since I last watched a baking competition and Sugar Rush Christmas sounds like it's the perfect show to watch to help me get into the festive holiday vibe. As the show's title suggests, the show gives a Christmas-themed twist on the classic baking competition 'where time is the most important ingredient.' More than finding out who wins this very festive competition, I'm excited to see all the Christmas-themed treats they'll be whipping up!"—Jamie

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Let It Snow (2019)

Where to watch: Netflix

"John Green books and films have been my guilty pleasure since teenhood, so when I found out this movie existed, I had to put it on my to-watch list. It's based on a 2008 novel of the same name, which was written in collabaration with Maureen Johnson and Lauren Myracle—real YA lovers would recognize the names. Both the novel and the film follow three interconnected love stories set with Christmas time as the backdrop. Basically, it's an old-fashioned, feel-good romance without the melodrama—as warm, lighthearted, and (surprisingly) touching as any good Christmas film should be."—Ashley

Klaus (2019)

Where to watch: Netflix

"I'm gathering my niece and nephew for this weekend watch! Klaus is an animated film that I missed out on last Christmas. The Santa Claus trope has been much explored but this one presents a unique-looking origin story with a grumpy woodsman (whose name is, of course, Klaus) and a bumbling postman set in a vaguely Nordic town. The cool 2-D animation—that somehow looks 3-D thanks to the shading—is a callback to my own childhood so I can't wait to see how this matches up!" —Mia

How the Grinch Stole Christmas (2000)

Where to watch: Netflix

"These are some really trying times, so I thought I'd revisit one of my favorite films growing up, How the Grinch Stole Christmas. I grew up reading Dr. Seuss books so I remember being thrilled to finally see one of my most adored books in live-action form. The tale revolves around the ill-tempered Grinch (Jim Carrey), who hates Christmas and decides to ruin the holiday for the merry and jolly Whos of Whoville—that is, until he befriends little Cindy Lou Who (Taylor Momsen). Aside from the heartwarming story, I'm also looking forward to seeing Taylor Momsen—a.k.a. Jenny Humphrey in Gossip Girl—as a little kid again."—Trish

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Holidate (2020)

Where to watch: Netflix

"While family reunions are usually fun, we can't deny that it's also a time when some relatives could be a little too...inquisitive for our own good. Well, we might be able to get some pointers from Holidate. Here, we follow Sloane (Emma Roberts), a 30-something single woman who is constantly prodded by her family to find a man. She then crosses paths with Jackson (Luke Bracey), who experiences the same thing. Together, they decide to be each other's 'holidates'—basically the date to bring to any occasion. While I kind of have an inkling on how this will all play out, there's nothing like a cute rom-com to start the weekend on a good note. "—MM

Korean Thrillers, a '90s Drama + More: What We Watched on the Weekend of November 7

PHOTO: Sony Pictures / Dawson's Creek

Veep (2020)

Where to watch: HBO Go

"Veep is one of those shows that I've always heard is good but have never gotten around to actually watching. Now I finally can thanks to streaming, and I'm loving it so much I'm feeling sad about the thought of getting to the end! Looking to find some humor in all the ridiculous things happening in the world these days? Veep is the show to watch. Selina Meyer's (Julia Louis-Dreyfus) acid-filled zingers are gold, too. One of my favorites: “Why don’t you put your running shoes on and get to the point?"—Jo

Dawson's Creek (1998 to 2003)

Where to watch: Netflix

"I first watched this series on Studio 23 way back in the late '90s and early '00s—a time when waiting for a whole before the next episode drops was still a thing. It would be fun to find out if I could still relate to the characters now that I'm older (and maybe a teeny-weeny bit wiser) or if I would cringe at the sight of their crazy, shallow teen drama."—Christa

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The Chase (2017)

Where to watch: Viu

"I've been watching a lot of K-Drama series recently so for this weekend I feel like switching it up and watch a Korean movie instead. I'm into a lot of thriller and murder-mystery so I'm excited to watch The Chase. The story revolves around a grumpy landlord who lives alone and is quite notorious in the neighborhood. While bombarding his tenants to pay up, he finds one of them lifeless in his apartment which was initially made to look like a suicide. But the landlord crosses paths with a retired detective who then tells him that his tenant was murdered and that a serial killer from 30 years ago is back. More tenants begin to disappear, so the landlord and the ex-detective work together to find the culprit and put an end to the murders...but things take a twist. I can't wait to see how everything unravels!"—Jamie

Peaky Blinders (2013 to present)

Where to watch: Netflix

"This period-crime drama centers around a family-run gang called the Peaky Blinders who resides in Birmingham, England in the late 1800s—expect a lot of violence and debauchery. Though often dark and gory, it's enjoyable and oftentimes even humorous seeing the bad guys break the rules and get away with it. Cillian Murphy stars as Thomas Shelby, the head of both the Peaky Blinders and the Shelby family and his cunning antics will have you rooting for him start to finish despite his questionable acts. Episodes are nearly an hour-long, so the show would easily fill up your entire weekend!"—Ashley

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Water Lemon (2015)

Where to watch: Cinema '76 @Home

"A quaint Filipino town? Strange characters? Fates intertwining in a vague plot? The trailer for this Pinoy indie had me hooked. The 2015 QCinema entry is set in the town of Mauban, where a grieving widow, a socially handicapped genius, a helpless grandfather, and more characters cross paths. It looks to be the quiet film that runs a little deeper than expected! Plus, it's one of the cool indie flicks you can watch free on Cinema '76's new digital platform—definitely worth looking into while the micro-cinemas are still closed."—Mia

Switched (2018)

Where to watch: Netflix

"I know, the body-swap trope tends to be overdone, but I've heard great things about Switched (a.k.a. Sora wo Kakeru Yodaka) and I'm raring to see it this weekend! This TV series is based on a shoujo manga of the same Japanese name, and revolves around popular student Ayumi, whom her childhood friend Koshiro confesses his love to. Just when they're about to go on their first date, Ayumi ends up switching bodies with another classmate of theirs, Umine. Ayumi and Umine are basically opposites—while Ayumi is basically Miss Perfection, Umine is unpopular with their class and has a misfortunate backstory—and I'm interested to see how Ayumi manages in those completely different shoes."—Trish

Intruder (2020)

Where to watch: iQIYI

"I've been looking for something suspensful to watch and found this horror film on streaming platform iQIYI. It stars Song Ji Hyo, who happens to be one of my favorite stars in the Korean variety show Running Man. Here, she plays a traumatized architect whose missing sister suddenly reappears after 25 years. The sibling element of the story makes me think of the Korean film A Tale of Two Sisters, which is one of my favorite thrillers. I'm hoping this would be as goosebumps-inducing as that movie!"—MM

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A Netflix Gem, Animated Films With Feels + More: What We Watched At the End of October

PHOTO: Netflix / The Queen's Gambit

The Queen's Gambit (2020)

Where to watch: Netflix

"I haven't had time to start watching this, but I've been hearing so many good things I'm hoping my expectations haven't gotten too high! Not too worried, though. Period pieces with great set design and good-looking costumes are one of my favorite things to watch—I last saw Anya Taylor-Joy as Emma in a gorgeous adaptation of Jane Austen's novel—and a good story to match is always a winning combination."—Jo

You Me Her (2016 to present)

Where to watch: Netflix

"You Me Her left a huge cliffhanger when the fourth season ended in 2019. Finally, 10 new episodes dropped on October 22 and I can find out if Izzy (Priscilla Faia) and the Trakarskys (Greg Poehler and Rachel Blanchard as Jack and Emma Trakarsky, respectively) are getting back together. If you need to catch up on this crazy story of a three-way romantic relationship between a free-spirited social worker and an otherwise boring suburban married couple, all five seasons (total of 50 episodes) are on Netflix."—Christa

Alice (2020)

Where to watch: Viu

"It's been a while since I lasted watched a sci-fi drama, so I'm looking forward to bingeing Alice this weekend! Interestingly enough, 'Alice' isn't a name of a person in this show; instead, it's the name of a place where time travelers come together. It is in the year 2050 when Alice was completed—around the same time a prophecy started to spread predicting the end of time travel. Yoo Min Hyuk (Kwak Shi Yang) and Yoon Tae Yi (Kim Hee Sun), a couple, are sent back to the year 1992 with a task at hand: to secure the book of prophecy. Things happen and  Yoon Tae Yi finds herself pregnant and decides to stay in the year 1992 where she changes her name to Park Sun Young and eventually gives birth to her son Park Jin Gyeom (Joo Won). As a side effect of time travel, Park Jin Gyeom is unable to feel emotions, adding an extra layer to the series' storyline. A total lunar eclipse happens in 2010—the same day his mom Park Sun Young gets murdered. Park Jin Gyeom becomes a detective to solve the mysterious case, but in 2020, he runs into a physics professor who looks exactly like his mother. Her name? Yoon Tae Yi. I'm excited to know where the story takes me!"—Jamie

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The Trial of the Chicago 7 (2020)

Where to watch: Netflix

"The Trial of the Chicago 7 tells the real-life story of a group of revolutionists prosecuted for the part they played in the countercultural protests at the 1968 Democratic National Convention held in Lincoln Park in Chicago. Though the film is a historical drama, the themes of dissent, violence, power, and democracy are purposely played out to emphasize their parallels to the divisive political landscape in the U.S. today. It was written and directed by the famous Aaron Sorkin and fans of his previous work like The West Wing, Newsroom, and The Social Network will enjoy the film's slick dialogue, unapologetic idealism, and quick-witted humor. I also urge anyone streaming the film to watch for Sacha Baron Cohen (of Borat fame) who gives an incredible performance. Eddie Redmayne, Joseph Gordon-LevittFrank Langella, John Caroll Lunch, Yahya Abdul-Mateen II, and Jeremy Strong also appear in the film. Plus, expect a killer, scene-stealing cameo from Batman himself, Michael Keaton."—Ashley

Over The Moon (2020)

Where to watch: Netflix

"I'm watching this animated tale this weekend mostly because I need a good emotional release, a.k.a. a feel-good movie complete with some tears and that wholesome feeling. Over the Moon follows the long line of stunningly animated children's movies with a healthy smattering of totally catchy—and sometimes achingly tender—songs with a little added flavor of its own. Think Coco, but Chinese! So yes, someone dies and a kid then goes on an amazing journey through a fantastical landscape before finally overcoming grief and learning an important lesson. Best part? Voicing the lead character, Fei Fei, is Cathy Ang, a New York-based Filipina-Chinese whose parents emigrated from the Philippines. Philippines represent!" Mia

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The Bucket List (2007)

Where to watch: Netflix

"This film isn't exactly new, but it does have an intriguing story, revolving around two cancer patients who find out they have less than a year to live and decide to fulfill a bucket list before their death. The two patients are exact opposites—Edward Cole (played by Jack Nicholson) is a self-centered billionaire, while Carter Chambers (played by Morgan Freeman) is a mechanic who gave up his dreams to raise his family—but I'm interested to see how they eventually get along in the movie! It's listed as a comedy drama, so I'm sure it delivers on the entertainment front; more than that though, I feel like it's one of those films that has a philosophical edge to it and will make you ponder on the meaning of life, the inevitability of death, and so on."—Trish

Hayop Ka! The Nimfa Dimaano Story (2020)

Where to watch: Netflix

"So what happens when you make an animated film featuring anthropomorphic animals with a teleserye-like storyline? You have Hayop Ka! The Nimfa Dimaano Story. But part of Hayop Ka!'s appeal is in the smallest, often-LOL-worthy details: Almost every scene features a pun that's either Pinoy culture-inspired or is a pop-culture reference. We got the chance to catch up with director Avid Liongoren in a press conference, where he revealed that the artists have a master list of what he calls 'stupid animal puns.' Since the movie is on Netflix, he encourages viewers to pause every once in a while. According to Liongoren, it takes two weeks for one background painting, which is on the screen for three seconds. I've already seen the movie once and I plan to rewatch to spot more easter eggs!"—MM

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A Thrilling Mystery, a Heart-Wrenching Movie About Exes + More: What We Watched on the Weekend of October 24

PHOTO: JTBC / The World of the Married

Rebecca (2020)

Where to watch: Netflix

"I love a good mystery, and the first time I saw the trailer for Rebecca, it made me think of the gothic creepiness of Thornfield Hall in Jane Eyre. The fact that Armie Hammer plays the husband who seems to be hiding something is a bonus—I've been a fan since I saw him in The Man From U.N.C.L.E.—and learning that the movie is based on a book by Daphne du Maurier clinches it! Will be sitting in front of the TV with a big bowl of popcorn for this for sure."—Jo

David Attenborough: A Life On Our Planet (2020)

Where to watch: Netflix

"If you've seen Netflix's Our Planet or BBC's The Blue Planet, then you've heard the distinct voice of English broadcaster and natural historian David Attenborough. The 93-year-old has been the brain and voice behind many natural history programs since the '50s; and in A Life On Our Planet, he talks about the wonders of the natural world, how humanity is destroying every single part of it, and how we can turn things aroundhopefully."—Christa

The World of the Married (2020)

Where to watch: Viu

"When The World of the Married first came out earlier this year, I didn't really feel like I was in the right headspace to watch it considering all the angry tweets and reactions I kept seeing on social media. At that time, there were so many things going on and so many things to get angry about so I resorted to watching my favorite sitcoms like Friends and Modern Family. Seven months into the quarantine, I finally decided to sit down and find out what the fuss about this K-Drama was all about. At first, I thought the K-Drama was simply about married men having affairs with women while the legal wives play martyr for the sake of their kids—but I couldn't have been more wrong. More than, well, adultery, the characters involved all had their own personal issues that added layers and depth to the drama's storyline. I'm nearing the show's finale and so far I feel for no one in the show (not the legal wife, not their kid, and definitely not the asshole of a husband) which is pretty interesting because they were able to pull off a plot with characters that are so unlikable! It wasn't a lie when they said you'll scream and yell and maybe even throw stuff at your screen while watching the episodes!"—Jamie

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Exes Baggage (2018)

Where to watch: Netflix

In case you didn't know, 2018's Dan Villegas-helmed rom-com Exes Baggage just landed on Netflix. As far as Pinoy rom-coms go, I tend to enjoy the more cynical takes on the genre and Exes Baggage is a good candidate for that. Real-life exes Angelica Panganiban and Carlo Aquino take their storied history onscreen as Pia and Nix, former lovers who run into each other at a party. Amidst polite hellos, they trade nostalgic flashbacks and confront lingering regrets. Their natural chemistry evokes both humor and poignance into the ebbs and flows of a relationship as they reflect on their lives together long after parting ways. —Ashley

Tsuredure Children (2017)

Where to watch: Netflix

"Sometimes I just want to relax to a light-hearted (but still meaningful!) series, and Tsuredure Children (sometimes romanized as Tsurezure or Tsuredzure Children) fits the bill. It’s based on a four-panel web manga by Toshiya Wakabayashi and follows a couple of high school students and their adventures in young love. Each roughly 10-minute episode focuses on two students and their relationship with each other, and it's the kind of series that balances comedic moments (in true anime fashion) with more serious and emotional ones, too. I’ve seen a couple of clips around YouTube and enjoyed them, so I think it’s about time I sat down to watch the whole thing from start to finish."—Trish

Minority Report (2002)

Where to watchHBO Go

"I grew up being fascinated by Nokia phones, and one of the things that have remained rent-free in my head is the fact that the Nokia 7650—yes, as in that 2002 slider phone which was the first to have a VGA camera—is featured in this movie. I finally got to watch the film a couple of days ago and I must say, the Tom Cruise sci-fi starrer is ahead of its time. One scene will remind you of how we are bombarded by ads while surfing the Internet. I also like the 'free will' versus 'determinism' themes, which might make you mull over the film long after the credits have rolled. "—MM

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